Lesson: Early Americans, Migration (Lesson Two)

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Lesson Objective

Social Scientists will be able to identify and articulate the migration and culture of Native American populations.

Lesson Plan

Standards:   G.2.5.1: Describe customs, celebrations, and traditions of selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Arkansas and the United States.

 

Objective: Social Scientists will be able to identify and articulate the migration and culture of Native American populations.

 

Duration: 60 minutes

 

Materials:

  • Worksheets
  • Pencils
  • PowerPoint (5 slides)

 

Agenda:

  • Do Now
  • Hook
  • Instruction
  • Guided Practice: Vocabulary
  • Independent Practice: Content Enrichment
  • Closure

 

Main Idea: By understanding the origins of one’s country we are better able to understand ourselves and how we change over time. The study of Native Americans will make us aware of different cultures and perspectives. We will see how the original inhabitants viewed and treated their environment. After studying Native Americans we can be more reflective about our American culture.

 

Do Now/Hook: Vocabulary and Share

 

Instruction: Good afternoon class. Yesterday, we will talk about the first Americans which we refer to as Native Americans. These people have lived in North America for thousands of years, and there are still Native American tribes today. Native Americans migrated from through the Bering Strait to get to America. When Native Americans arrived to North America, they had to adjust to the temperature and the way of life. They moved a lot so they are considered to be nomadic. They also had to survive by hunting small game and large game. Game does not mean something we play for fun but it has another definition that we will learn today. Now, I’ve said a couple of words that you may not be familiar with. Before we read more about Native Americans as the First Americans, let’s learn some new words!


Step 1: Introduction to new word (Do this for each word)

  1. Instructor will write the word on the board and then say the word.
  2. Walk away from the board.
  3. Ask students to say the word.

        Ask several students to repeat the word.

        In unison, ask students to say the word.

  1. Orally break the word into syllables.

        Ask all students to “whale talk” the word.

        Ask a student how many syllables the word has.

        Ask all students to “stomp” each syllable on the table.

        Ask individual students:  What is the (first, last, middle, second, third) syllable?

  1. Ask all students to say the word.

 

Step 2: Tie Pronunciation to the Word’s Spelling

  1. Walk back to the word, expository, on the board.
  2. Ask students to read the word.
  3. Ask how many syllables the word has.

        How many vowels do you see?

        Are they together or apart?

        Do you see a silent -e?

  1. Guide students to match orally pronounced syllables to written syllables.

        Break the word into syllables in boxes drawn on the board.

  1. Ask all students to orally spell each syllable:

        Ask individual students to orally spell each syllable.

        Erase the spelling of the word.

        Ask a few students to orally spell the word. Challenge some students to spell the word backwards.

  1. Ask all students to spell the word on worksheet, check their spelling, and sit in Delta-Yes once they have finished. Instructor will walk around the room to make sure students have spelled it correctly on their worksheet.

 

Step 3: Discuss the Word’s Meaning/Provide a Student Friendly Definition

Show visual anchors and provide a student friendly definition for students to write on their worksheet.

       Game (noun): game
Game means any animal hunted for food

       There are different types of game. There are large game like buffalos, sheep, and goats and smaller game like rabbits, raccoons, and opossums. Yum, yum! J  

 

       Adapt (noun): a-dapt
Adapt means to change to fit in better

       Kids at KIPP have to adapt to a new school. They have to try to change to be able to survive in a school that has much order and structure.

 

       Nomadic (adjective): no-ma-dic
Nomadic means moving often

       Kids at KIPP have to adapt to a new school. They have to try to change to be able to survive in a school that has much order and structure.


Guided Practice: Let’s look on the back of your worksheet. You have a passage that uses the words from our list. Instructor and students will read over the first paragraph. Class will continue to read over content and ask the first question. After the first question has been answer, students will continue to answer the questions.


Independent Practice: If you finish your reading comprehension section early, go to your extension. Instructor will walk around the room to see if students are answering the questions fully and with thought.


Closure: Instructor and students will review answers.


Exit Ticket: Write it out!

Lesson Resources

Native Americna Migration   
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