Lesson: Week of March 12

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Lesson Objective

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Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan:  Ronni Stefano

4th Grade Reading – March 12

GLE(s): ELA‑1‑E4,  ELA‑1‑E5,  ELA‑1‑E7,  ELA‑7‑E1,  ELA‑7‑E4

Objective/SWBAT: 

  • Identify opinion words.  Write a fact and opinion
  • Read on level text
  • Answer comprehension and critical thinking questions

Do Now: 

Write one fact and one opinion about our novel “A Single Shard”.  Scholars bring their fact and opinion to the carpet to share and locate opinion words.

Direct Instruction (I DO):

Scholars will be working on reading skills:  cause/effect and main idea/details.

Shared reading of chapter three “A Single Shard”.   Teacher facilitates a learning conversation throughout the chapter discussing basic comprehension questions.  Teacher leads scholars to identify cause and effect relationships and the main idea of the chapter.

Guided Practice (WE DO):

Scholars locate three details to support the main idea of the chapter with their shoulder buddy.

 

Independent Practice:

Group One:  Students should write a one paragraph, 5-finger summary of chapter three. The summary should include the main characters, setting, problem, main events and solution.Group Two:  Independent Reading

Group Three:  vocabulary work.  Underline words in text.  Write your definition from context clues.

Group Four: Ms. Stefano

Group Five:  Mr. Mickens

Exit Ticket/Closure

List two cause/effect relationships in chapter three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan:  Ronni Stefano 

4th Grade Reading- March 13

GLE(s):  ELA‑1‑E4,  ELA‑1‑E5,  ELA‑1‑E7,  ELA‑7‑E1,  ELA‑7‑E4

Objective/SWBAT: 

Understand author’s purpose:  Persuade

Do Now (5-7 minutes): 

Context Clues

Direct Instruction (I DO): 

Students should be seated on the carpet with a partner.  They will be expected to turn and talk to this partner throughout the lesson.  Readers we have learned so much during our informational text unit.  Over the next few days we will focus on author’s purpose.  Just like when we read, we should set a purpose for our reading.  Author’s have a purpose for writing, they have a goal for their readers.  An author will either persuade, entertain, or inform you about a topic.  Today, we will focus on persuasion as an author’s purpose.

To persuade means to convince someone to do something.  We see persuasion all the time in our daily lives.  For example, when you watch an advertisement for a new game or pair of shoes, the writer of the commercial is trying to persuade you to buy those items.  Authors can do the same thing in their writing.  A writer might give you specific facts that support their opinions in an attempt to persuade you to feel a certain way or to believe their argument.  We must be critical readers to understand what an author is trying to persuade us to believe about a certain idea. 

Today we will look at a persuasive article and notice words in the text that help us conclude the author’s purpose is to persuade.  Teacher places article, “To Drill or Not to Drill?” on the overhead. 

 

Guided Practice (WE DO):    



Teacher reads aloud the first paragraph.  I noticed that the author states his argument in a question.  The author wants us to understand that some companies want to drill oil in a place where many animals live.  I wonder what the author is trying to persuade us to believe?  I will keep reading to find out.

Teacher reads aloud the second paragraph.  In this paragraph the author is telling me what the oil industry thinks.  Turn and tell your partner what the people in the oil industry believe.  Students share out responses.  You are all exactly right.  The oil industry believes that drilling for oil will reduce how much gas costs in the United States.

Let’s read the next paragraph.  Teacher reads aloud paragraph three.  In this paragraph I know that the author is telling me what he believes.  I know this because the author states “I believe”.  Turn and tell your partner what the author thinks.  Students share out responses.  That’s right the author gave us many reasons why they feel that drilling is not a great idea.  I know the author wants to persuade me to believe the same thing.  The author provided many facts to inform my decision with the goal of persuading me to feel the same way.  The author’s purpose was to persuade me to believe that drilling is not a good idea.

Independent Practice (YOU DO):

Today when you return to your seats I want you to notice the author’s purpose.  I have two separate paragraphs to show you.  As you read these independently I want you to think about what the author is persuading you to believe.  Then record your response under the articles. 

 

Exit Ticket/Closure:

Teacher should collect the worksheet from independent work.  This can be used to assess which students mastered the skill and which students need more practice. 

 

 

Lesson Plan:  Ronni Stefano 

4th Grade Reading

GLE(s):  ELA‑1‑E4,  ELA‑1‑E5,  ELA‑1‑E7,  ELA‑7‑E1,  ELA‑7‑E4

Objective: 

Understand author’s purpose to inform

 

Do Now (5-7 minutes): 

SRA Finding Details

Direct Instruction (I DO): 

Students should be seated on the carpet with a partner.  They will be expected to turn and talk to this partner throughout the lesson.  Yesterday, we learned that author’s have a purpose for their writing.  One purpose for writing is to persuade readers to believe or think a certain thing.  You were all able to see many examples of persuasive writing yesterday.  Today, we will learn about the second purpose an author may have, to inform the reader. It is important to understand the author’s purpose to become critical readers.  Critical readers adjust how they read based on the author’s purpose.  

Guided Practice (WE DO):    

If an author’s purpose is to inform the reader, he or she hopes to teach the reader about a specific topic.  The author will use facts to explain a topic to a reader.  Some examples of this type of text are textbooks, newspapers, or encyclopedias.  We will look at some examples of texts today to notice the difference between texts that are meant to persuade and ones that are meant to inform.

Watch me as I read through the article titled, Michael Jackson: The King of Pop.  I notice that each of the headings explain a part of Michael Jackson’s life.  I think the purpose of this article is to inform me about Michael Jackson. 

Teacher reads aloud the information under the first heading.  I noticed the author used facts in this paragraph.  The author didn’t mention what they believe or think but instead gave me information about Michael Jackson as an artist. 

As I read the second paragraph, think to yourself what the author is trying to inform us about.  Teacher reads aloud information under the second heading titled, “The Jackson Five”.  Turn and tell your partner a fact that author explained in this section.  Students should turn and discuss a fact they learned during the reading.  Students share out facts they learned. 

Did you notice while I was reading we all learned something new about Michael Jackson.  The author told us many facts about his life with the Jackson Five.  The author’s goal or purpose was to inform us about a new topic, the Jackson Five. 

I knew the author’s purpose was to inform, so I began to read the information looking for facts and interesting details. I read this article very differently than I would a persuasive article.  Today and everyday as you read, you should think about the author’s purpose and change your reading strategies based on that purpose.

When you return to your seats you will have a few paragraphs in front of you that are informational.  The author’s goal is to inform you or teach you about a topic.  It is your job as a reader to list two facts that you learn from each paragraph.  This is good practice for reading because it forces us to think about and write what we are learning.

 

Independent Work:

Students return to their seats and complete the worksheet.  If students finish early they may read independently.  They should be listing important facts they learn on the worksheet.

Exit Ticket:

Students should turn in the worksheet at the end of workshop time.  This should be used to assess which students need remediation with this skill.  Students may share out facts they learned after the worksheets are submitted.

 

 

Lesson Plans:  Ronni Stefano 

4th Grade Reading-March 15

Scholars are in the library working on library skills, literature groups, paired reading.

Group One:  I Station Reading

Group Two:  Author’s purpose:  Scholars sort box of books according to the author’s purpose.  List

Group Three:  Choose book/kick back and read

Group Four:  Poetry/partner read

 

 

Lesson Plan:  Ronni Stefano 

4th Grade Reading- March 16

GLE(s):  ELA‑1‑E4,  ELA‑1‑E5,  ELA‑1‑E7,  ELA‑7‑E1,  ELA‑7‑E4

Objective:  Scholars learn test taking skills in reading

 

Do Now (5-7 minutes): 

SRA Finding Details

Direct Instruction (I DO): 

Teacher models skills in reading and test taking.

 

Guided Practice (WE DO):    

Scholars answer questions

 

Exit ticket:  Write a short paragraph explaining a reading strategy that helps scholar with comprehension.

 

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