Lesson: Main Idea (fiction), Lesson 5

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Lesson Objective

SWBAT identify the elements of fiction (problem, solution, character, and setting); SWBAT select and justify the most important event in a book; SWBAT identify the theme of a work as what the author is trying to tell the reader.

Lesson Plan

Edward W. Brooke Charter School

Problems in Fiction Unit

 

Mini-Lesson: Right at the beginning of the book, readers can predict what the problem will be.

 


Materials:

  • Book Baggies with leveled fiction books
  • Leveled picture books pre-picked out for each student to use during independent reading time (these books should be ones that they can make prediction about using the title/illustration/first couple pages or blurb).
  • Familiar Read Aloud (suggested: A Chair for My Mother or Julius, Baby of the World)

 

Connection: Readers, in this unit you have been learning how to think more carefully about the problems in your book. Every book has a problem, and you must understand the problem in order to understand the story. Today I am going to teach you that you can predict what the problem will be at the beginning of the book.

 

 

Teach: “Readers can predict what the problem will be right at the beginning of a book. You can use the title, the pictures, and the information at the beginning of the story to guess what the problem might be. Predicting the problem will help you stay extra focused while reading because you’ll want to know if you are correct. And, if you think carefully about all the information the author is giving you, you will probably guess right! Let me show you how I use the title, the cover illustration, and the first page of this story to make a prediction about the problem” (use any new picture book for this part. Some examples might include, A Chair for My Mother, Julius, Baby of the World).  Then say, “Did you notice that I thought carefully about the title, illustrations, and beginning of the story before making my prediction? Did you feel more focused and interested in reading on to find out if I was correct?”

 

 

Active Engagement: Hold up another unfamiliar book. Show them the cover and read a few lines of the book. Then say, “Tell your partner what you predict the problem will be.”

 

 

Link: “Whenever you begin reading a new book, use the title, the illustrations, and the information right at the beginning of the book to predict what the problem will be! I placed a new book in each of your baggies. I would like you all to make predictions about the problems right at the beginning. You can write your predictions on the post-it I put on your desk.”

 

 

Share: Call on several students to share their predictions. Then say, “Remember, whenever you begin reading a new book, use the title, the illustrations, and the information right at the beginning of the book to predict what the problem will be!”

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