Lesson: Slavery in the Thirteen Colonies

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Lesson Objective

Describe the living and working conditions of many African Americans living in the Thirteen Colonies.

Lesson Plan

Do Now:

Ask students to take 4 minutes to analyze the primary source photo they see on the left-hand side of the page.  Have them write down everything they notice.  Push the students to write for the entire time.

 

Share out interesting noticings and track common themes.

 

I Do/We Do:

 

- Read the instructions carefully with students as to the process they are using to analyze these passages. 

Review active reading steps with gestures:

1. Know the questions (tap head and then make a question mark in the air with your pointer finger)

2. Circle key terms (draw a circle in the air with your finger, mime turning a key in a lock)

4. Underline important information (draw a line in the air with your fingers)

3. Bracket significant paragraphs (use your thumb and pointer fingers in each hand to create brackets in the air)

 

- Model Passage One: The story of Olaudah Equiano with students.  Have them first read the questions and identify what key words they are looking for in the passage.  Then take turns and have two students read a paragraph.

 

- Have students identify what important information they underlined in paragraphs 1 & 2.  Then model how students use this information to answer questions 1-3. 

 

- Ask students to work with a partner to complete question 4.  Share out answers and highlight good use of textual support

 

We Do/You Do:

- Have students work together to begin the active reading process on the next story about Alexander Falconbridge.  Give students 10 minutes to complete activity and answer questions. 

 

- Make sure to constantly monitor student progress and give positive reinforcement when students are working well together, underlining key information, and using good evidence to support claims.

 

- Once time is up, review answers with class and compile list of best responses.

 

- Have students repeat this process with partner on the final story of Solomon Northup. Give students 8 minutes to complete activity and answer questions. 

 

- Make sure to constantly monitor student progress and give positive reinforcement when students are working well together, underlining key information, and using good evidence to support claims.

 

- Once time is up, review answers with class and compile list of best responses.

 

- Discuss with students commonalities and differences between the stories and experiences of the different people involved in the slave trade. Which person experienced the most tragedy?

 

HMK:


- Before students leave, review graphs and questions with them.  If there is time, have students begin their homework

 

 

What went well?

The historical accounts really grab their attention.  Since slavery is a topic many of them have been exposed to before, they are very eager to share their knowledge on the topic.

 

What would you change?

Include a variety of resources, not just stories, but more pictures and videos explaining experiences on the slave trade.

 

What needs explanation?

Students often have difficulty analyzing the graphs, so it is important to review them before students leave class. 

Lesson Resources

LL1Slaveryin13Colonies  
1,316
LL1_SlaveryinTheColonies_KEY.doc  
649

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