Lesson: Non-fiction Text Structures: Author's Purpose: Graphic Features (Lesson 30)

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Lesson Objective

To get the complete idea of what the author wanted to tell you (the author’s purpose in writing) you need to read, understand, and connect all parts of the text, including graphic and text features.

Lesson Plan

Lesson 30 (Continued from Lesson 29):

Standard: Identify the purpose of common graphic features (for example, charts, graphs, maps, diagrams, illustrations, timelines).

 

Big Idea:  Writers use lots of evidence to support the main idea or theme.  These supporting details fill the text; they are found in every paragraph, all textual features, and all graphic features. 

 

Teaching Point: To get the complete idea of what the author wanted to tell you (the author’s purpose in writing) you need to read, understand, and connect all parts of the text, including graphic and text features.

Materials:

RW: Reading binders, highlighters, copies of “Madagascar: A World Apart”

RA: copy of The Deep Sea Floor

 

 

Reading Workshop Lesson:

  • Scholars, we have been working on understanding the purpose of all parts of the text, including text and graphic features. All the pictures, maps, graphs, and diagrams you find in a text relate to what the author wants to tell us so we need to think about the purpose of each one. 
  • Last time we read an article that had a lot of text and graphic features. We are going to re-read “Madagascar: A World Apart” to find evidence that answers this question [put up OR topic.]
  • How many parts? (1)
  • Where am I going to find my evidence? (In the Must Be Patient section)
  • Re-read and highlight evidence; write paragraph as appropriate to your scholars’ needs.

 

 

 

Read Aloud

  • Readers, we have spent this week talking about text and graphic features and how the author has a purpose for including each of those features in a text. Today we are going to continue reading “The Deep Sea Floor” to notice graphic and text features and talk about their purpose in the text.
  • Turn to page 12 and look at the diagrams.  Look at it before reading the text because they purpose of diagrams is often to help the reader understand the text better. 
  • Read the text on page 12, paragraph by paragraph.  Discuss what each paragraph is about and then discuss how the diagram helps us understand the information in that paragraph.   
  • Look at the pictures on pages 14-15.  Take some general comments. 
  • Read the text on page 14, paragraph by paragraph.  How do the pictures support this first paragraph?  Shows a ship with lights – people can’t just swim around and it is dark, but animals are there.
  • Read the second paragraph.  How do the pictures support this?  Give us examples of these animals. 
  • Practice using the phonetic guides to pronounce the names of these animals.
  • Look at the picture on page 16.    Read each paragraph (put up phonetic guide while reading and have them as a group pronounce amphipods) and talk about how the picture supports your understanding of each paragraph.  Notice that the last two words are in bold so I can look them up in the glossary, but I bet that the next paragraph will explain it because that is normally what happens in nonfiction.
  • Look at the picture on page 17.  Then read the paragraph.  How does the picture support the text?

Lesson Resources

Lesson 30 Open Response.docx  
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