Lesson: Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - Judi Berrett: Sequencing Details

149 Views
0 Downloads
5 Favorites

Lesson Objective

Students will be able to sequence details from a given fiction story. Students will be able to write a properly sequenced story.

Lesson Plan

 

Objective: 

Students will be able to sequence details from a given fiction story.

Students will be able to write a properly sequenced story.

Lesson Plan:  Sequencing Details

 

Opening:  Sequencing means putting things or events in the correct order. In English, we have a number of words that help us to do this. But is sequencing important? Let’s find out.).

 

Direct Instruction (I DO):

Read the paragraph below:

I woke up and the sun was shining. I had breakfast. I decided to go to the beach. I met my friends at the ice-cream shop. We had ice cream, and we spent the morning swimming. We fetched our bikes and went for a ride and we all had hot dogs at my house. Everyone left and I was so tired I went to bed.

 

Is this paragraph really clear?  Do we really know when this person did all these events throughout the day?

 

Explain that we can guess that these events are in order, but without key sequencing words we really don’t know when they happened.

 

Read the paragraph again, but now there will be key sequencing words:

 

I woke up when the sun was shining. First, I had breakfast, and then I decided to go to the beach. Before I went to the beach, I met my friends at the ice-cream shop. We had ice cream, and then we spent the morning swimming. Afterwards, we fetched our bikes and went for a ride and later we all had hot dogs at my house. Finally, everyone left and I was so tired I went to bed.

 

Model finding the words in the paragraph that helped you to know exactly when the events happened.

 

Here are some more sequencing phrases words that you can look for when sequencing:

Next

Then

After

Afterwards

Following

Finally

Once that was done,

Once we finished,

When we finished,

When that was over,

Next
Finally
Last
To begin with
First
Then
After that
Second

 

 

Guided Practice (WE DO):

Now read the next paragraph.

I woke up when we spent the morning swimming. First, we had ice cream then everyone left and I was so tired I went to bed. Before the sun was shining I decided to go to the beach, then we all had hot dogs at my house. Afterwards, I met my friends at the ice cream shop and later I had breakfast. Finally, we fetched our bikes and went for a ride.

 

What is wrong with this paragraph??? The second paragraph has the same sentences and sequence words (can you find them all?) but they are in the wrong order and so the story doesn’t make sense. Here is another short story for you to read:

 

See if you can find all the sequencing words in it:

 

Tommy was building himself a snow fort when he saw the two dogs. First, the big black dog from next door came towards him, next a large, shaggy brown dog came running across the road. Tommy was afraid of dogs, but before he could go inside the dogs were right at the fort. He hid inside the fort. Then he started making snowballs for ammunition. Finally, he thought he had enough and he peeped over the walls of the fort. When they saw him, both dogs started wagging their tails. After he got back home, Tommy told his mom, “I’m not afraid of dogs anymore, they only wanted to play!”

 

When you have finished reading Tommy’s story, go back and draw a circle around each of the sequence words. How many did you find?

 

Have students write some sequencing sentences.

 

Put students into small groups and practice together.

 

The words in the brackets are the sequencing words that need to be inserted into the new sentence.

 

I cleaned my teeth. I got up. (after)

I went to school. I packed my bag. (before)

We drove to the airport. It was still dark. (while)

I did my homework. I played outside. (first, then)

I had dinner. I watched TV. I went to bed. (after, then)

 

After writing the sentences, put the sentences in order to make a paragraph that is properly sequenced.

 

Read Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett

Group (Independent) Practice (YOU DO Together):

Explain to students that they are going to show their knowledge of sequencing by writing a story that is just as crazy as “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs”.

Toss Across: (see attached description)

Students will be given a page with a picture on it (see attached file)

Students will start their story basing it on the picture (write two sentences)

Students will then ball up their paper and find someone to toss it to.

The next student will then continue the story. 

·         Make sure to use the sequencing words within their addition.

·         Students need to read what came first and then continue the story.

Repeat these steps until you want to end it.

The last toss needs to go back to the original starter and that student will bring the story to a close.

Closing:  If time allows, have students share their stories.

Homework:  (see attached file)  Send a photocopy of “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs”  by Jon Scieszka home and have students complete the activity.




Lesson Resources

Lesson 88 Sequencing Hmwk   Homework
15
Lesson 88 Modern Fantasy Toss Across   Combination
4
Lesson 88   Lesson Plan
20
Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs
149

Close

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close