Lesson: I Wanna Iguana - Karen Orloff: Author's Purpose

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Lesson Objective

Students will be able to identify author’s purpose (to inform, to persuade, to entertain) in a fiction text and state why this will help them in their comprehension.

Lesson Plan

Objective:  Students will be able to identify author’s purpose (to inform, to persuade, to entertain) in a fiction text and state why this will help them in their comprehension.

 

Lesson Plan: 

 

DO NOW:   Why do we write?  Is there a reason?  Why do authors write?  Explain.

 

Opening:  Have a discussion around the DO NOW

 

Guided Practice (WE DO):

Most writing is intended to inform, persuade, or entertain.  Critical readers can identify the author’s reasons for writing text and adjust their reading method to match the author’s purpose. They learn to read with skepticism, for example, when the passage suggests that dogs make better pets than cats or when an advertisement for cereal tells them that its brand has 100% more of the daily requirement of nutrients than Brand X.

Inform, Persuade, Entertain

Explain to students that the author’s purpose is his or her reason for writing a passage in a book, magazine, letter, or website.

Sometimes the author writes because he wants to sell something or persuade the reader of the value of his idea.

Ask students if they can give examples of this kind of writing. List their responses on the dry board. If they have trouble giving examples, write some examples for them on the board. Possible answers:

  • TV advertisements for toys, food, or services

  • newspaper or magazine advertisements for food, clothing, or services

  • articles telling readers the author’s opinion

  • articles written to convince readers to take an action

Tell them that sometimes the author writes to inform the reader. Ask students if they can give examples of this kind of writing. Write the responses on the dry board. Possible answers:

  • a list of classroom rules

  • the biography of Abraham Lincoln

  • a brief history of Ancient Egypt

Sometimes writers write for fun or entertainment, remind them that many of the things they read are for fun or entertainment. Ask them for examples. Possible answers:

  • the titles of their chapter or trade books

  • the titles of stories in their reading books

  • funny rhymes or poems

Read “I Wanna Iguana” by Karen Orloff

Model and think aloud for students the process of finding out the author’s purpose within the text.

·         Sometimes, it is hard to tell from just the title as to what the author’s purpose may be.   For example “I Wanna Iguana”

Author’s Purpose Three Corners:

Write a variety of book/text/magazine article titles on sentence strips.  Have a variety of texts available to hold up as well.

Pick three corners in the room and label with a different author’s purpose. 

Hold up the sentence strip or text up for students to read and have them go the respective corner of the room to identify the purpose.

·         For students that are having trouble have students explain why they chose the corner they did.

Continue playing until students have mastered the concept.

Independent Practice (YOU DO):

Have students choose their own independent reading book and answer some of the following questions:  (see attached file)

  • Based on the title, why do think the author wrote this selection?

  • Which words do you think best describe the main reason the author wrote this selection: to provide readers with information? To describe a person, event, or issue? To express their own thoughts and feelings? To persuade readers to think about an issue in a certain way and to take action? Or to entertain the reader?

  • Why did the author write the article from a particular point of view?

  • How did the author influence your response to the selection?

  • Was the author’s purpose specifically stated?

  • Do you think that the author achieved his/her intended purposes? Did the article effectively give information? Entertain readers? Express the author’s thoughts and feelings? Persuade readers to think about an issue and/or take action?

  • What examples from the text support your conclusions about author’s purpose?

  • Based on the answer about the title, was your author’s purpose prediction correct?

Lesson Resources

Lesson 87   Lesson Plan
6
Lesson 87 Author s Purpose   Classwork
9
I Wanna Iguana
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