Lesson: Historical Fiction Setting: Bud, Not Buddy (Lesson 4)

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Lesson Objective

Readers notice when the time or setting changes in a text. They think about why this time or setting is important to the main character.

Lesson Plan

Lesson 4:

Standards:

  • Identify order in which events happened and identify shifts in time in texts. 
  • Determine the setting and the significance of the setting on the traits, feelings, and motivations of characters.

 

Big Idea: Authors write historical fiction to show the reader what it was like to live in a certain time period.  Readers can use historical fiction to learn about new settings. 

 

 

Teaching Point: Readers notice when the time or setting changes in a text. They think about why this time or setting is important to the main character.

Materials:

Reading binders, pencils, copies of Bud, Not Buddy

 

Reading Workshop Lesson:

  • Readers, we’ve been discussing how important it is to understand the setting in historical fiction. Today I am going to teach you that sometimes, the author goes back in time to describe another time or setting that is important to the main character. When readers notice that the time or setting changes in their book, they think about why this setting is important to the main character. We are going to start reading chapter 5, and I want you to raise your hand when you notice that the time or place has changed.
  • [Hopefully students will raise their hand when the time changes on page 39. If not, point it out and re-read. Discuss why the author chose to go back to describe Momma sharing these memories with Bud.]
  • [Stop at the bottom of page 43.] The author spends a lot of time describing this conversation between Bud and Momma. It seems like the idea of one door closing and another door opening is really important to Bud. What does it mean? [Discuss.]
  • [Read to the end of the chapter. Take general comments.]
  • Today we are going to write another short open response. We are going to take a direct quote from the text and elaborate on it. Here is today’s question [post and read aloud: Why does Momma insist that Bud’s name is Bud, not Buddy?]
    • Find the evidence (on pages 41-42)
    • Go back and write the topic sentence: “Momma insists that Bud’s name is Bud, not Buddy.”
    • Quote the most important direct quotation from the evidence (either the one about the flower on page 42, or the one when she says the Buddy is like a dog’s name on page 41.) Check to make sure it is punctuated correctly.
    • Add elaboration to explain why the evidence is important; for example, explain in your own words how Bud is like a flower bud or why she wouldn’t want her son to have a name that is used for a dog.

 


Lesson Resources

Chapter 5 - Open Response.docx  

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