Lesson: Clues, Problems, and Wonderings

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Lesson Objective

Students will be able to identify clues, problems, and wonderings within a story. Students will be able to identify the author’s purpose of a story, identify the genre, and identify the genre and identify the author's point of view.

Lesson Plan

 

Clues Problems Wonderings Lesson

 

Objectives: 

Students will be able to identify clues, problems, and wonderings within a story.

Students will be able to identify the author’s purpose of a story, identify the genre, and  identify the author’s point of view.

Do-Now:  List some things we can do with a book before we even read it? 

Connection:  There are many things we can do with books before we even read them and then when we open them up and go through the pages we are exploring books to a whole new level!  Today when you look at a book you are going to look through the book as a “detective” and look for specifics like clues, problems, and wonderings.

Teach/Model:  As we go through a story we can look for different clues about what the story is going to be about, when we look for clues we go through steps as we do predicting.  Make on chart paper an enlarged version of the graphic organizer, have a section for clues, problems, and wonderings.  Use a story to explore how you can use the clues section.

Filling out the clues section:  When looking for clues readers can look at pictures, can read  a page of text, look at the ending, look at the characters, and get some “clues about the story” they can write those clues in the clues section.  This part is activating your reader’s mind. 

Model using a text to fill out the clues section.

Note:  This can be done with a non-fiction or fiction text

Filling out the problems section: 

As you are reading the book good readers look for an indentify problems as they go through the text.  You can identify problems within the story itself, or within characters, or sometimes even within other elements of stories like settings. 

Model using a text to fill out the problems section.

Filling out the wonderings section:  As good readers explore, read, and connect with a text they take time to have “wonderings” happen in their brains.  Good readers wonder what will happen next, they wonder about a characters choices or words, they are always having wonderings.  As you find wonderings in your book you will take time to note them down.

Model using a text to fill out the wonderings section.

 

Active Engagement:  Turn and talk to your partner about a clue, wonderings, or problems, you have so far with the book I have read to you.

Independent Work:  Students will read their independent books, guided reading books, class text, or a book in a center and complete the organizer:  clues, problems, and wonderings. 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Resources

Clues Problems Wonderings Resource  
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