Lesson: Westing Game Ch. 10-14

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Lesson Objective

Students read and demonstrate comprehension of Chapters 10-14, in which the Game appears to get violent.

Lesson Plan

 Lesson Name: Westing Game Ch. 10-14            Course: High School Language Arts by Anke al-Bataineh

 

Objective:  

Students read and demonstrate comprehension of Chapters 10-14, in which the Game appears to get violent.

 

Essential Questions:            (write on board)

Which pairs work together and which are divided?

Which pairs seem suspicious?

What evidence can be found and believed to know who is guilty?

 

Materials:           

Drawing Paper

Ch. 10-14 worksheet

Character Trackers

 

Anticipatory Set:         (5 min)

Have students make predictions:

Which pair seems most likely to win? Why?

Has your idea of this changed? Why?

What do you think will happen at the party?

 

Input:         (5 min)

After reading each chapter, you may choose to assign a team of students to mapping (in words or pictures) each event and then the evidence against any suspects. These events would be the stealing of Sydelle’s notebook, the first bomb, the second bomb, and perhaps Sydelle’s illness. Students could display or present their “detective work” for the class.

 

Guided Practice:         (25 min)

Follow the procedures you established in the beginning of the book for reading as a class, monitoring vocabulary comprehension, reviewing vocabulary, and asking to students to label and/or generate questions on the chapters.

 

In Ch. 14, I began leaving out paragraphs that didn’t contain direct information, or which added unnecessary confusion. Below are the paragraphs I skipped. Occasionally, I might tell students a sentence about what happened in the skipped paragraphs.

 

Page 97, last three paragraphs after “play it his way.”

            Through Page 98, last two paragraphs. Start again with “’It’s freezing…”

Page 99, last three paragraphs after “Denton Deere paced…”

            Through Page 100, last three paragraphs. Start again with “On a bench…”

Page 101, last five paragraphs after chipped front tooth…”

            Through Page 102, third paragraph. Start again with “Angela twisted the engagement…”

Page 103, first paragraph from top of page.

            Through Page 103, 9th paragraph. Start again with “In the overstuffed…”

 

Independent Work:         (20 min)

Allow students some time each class period to track events in their Sequence Map and investigate their character.

 

Conclusion/Assessment:         (5 min)

Use these reflection questions after each chapter.

Ch. 10- Why did Angela go into the kitchen and start crying? What do you think is bothering her?

Ch. 11- Why did Chris ask who had been kicked? Who do you think it was? Why do you think that?

Ch. 12- What do you think is the motive for the bombing? Who do you think is guilty? Why do you think that?

Ch. 13- Why do you think, would the bomber want to target the Wexler’s? Who do you think the bomber is at this point? Why?

Ch. 14- In your opinion, does the fact that Sydelle made up her illness make her more or less likely to be guilty of any of the crimes in the book? Explain why.

 

 

Lesson Reflection:

What went well?

What would you change?

What needs explanation?

Students were highly interested in the bombings and were amusingly tense during these chapters.

Depending on the dynamics of your group, this tension could be upsetting for them. If need be, you might describe the key events rather than reading them.

In Ch. 14, I began leaving out paragraphs that didn’t contain direct information, or which added unnecessary confusion. Occasionally, I might tell students a sentence about what happened in the skipped paragraphs.

 

 

 

Lesson Resources

westing game test 3a  
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westing game test 3  
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westing game 10 14  
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westing game 10 14  
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WestingCh10 14   Lesson Plan
220

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