Lesson: Lesson 1: North versus South in the 1800s

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Lesson Objective

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to (SWBAT) understand what the focus of the unit is on. By the end of the lesson, SWBAT compare and contrast the social, cultural, and geographic conditions of the North and South before the Civil War.

Lesson Plan

Objective:

By the end of the lesson, SWBAT understand what the focus of the unit is on.

 

By the end of the lesson, SWBAT compare and contrast the social, cultural, and geographic differences between the North and South before the Civil War.

 

Key Points:

·       The North and South were very different geographically, culturally, and economically.

·       The South was very agrarian with huge plantations that required a lot of manpower.

·       The North was urban and full of cities and factories.

·       Abolitionists were found in the North.

·       The West was an area of conflict because people were passionate on whether those areas should be free or slave areas.

·       Vocabulary: North, South, Rural, Urban, Slavery, Abolitionist

Essential Question: How did the differences between the North and South create conflict and war between the two regions?

 

Assessment:

At the end of the lesson, students will have to complete a Venn diagram comparing the North and the South. In addition, the students will fill out a worksheet entitled, “I am from the North..I am from the South…” This worksheet will assess what the students learned from the lesson. Finally, students will do a brief exit ticket on the following prompt: “write down two differences between the North and South before the Civil War.” The teacher will collect the Venn diagrams, worksheet, and exit ticket and use their answers as a formative look at their progress.

 

Standard:

SS5H1 The student will explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.

 

Opening: (10 minutes)

Teacher:

·       Teacher will put the following starter on the board to get the students thinking: “If anything, what do you know about the Civil War?”

·       T will ask the Ss to write their responses down on the K part of the KWL chart that the students received as they walked in the door.

·       T will ask the Ss to work quietly.

·       T will then ask the Ss to call out some of the answers that they wrote down.

·       T will write down the information on a large KWL chart either displayed through an LCD or on chart paper.

·       T will expect that students will not know that much or have false ideas about the Civil War.

·       T will use the information that the Ss share out as an informal pre- assessment on the Civil War.

·       T will tell the Ss that they are about to start a unit on the Civil War.

·       T will tell the Ss that the Civil War was a war the developed between the Northern and Southern parts of the United States.

·       T will tell the Ss that today’s lesson about the geographic, economic, and cultural differences between the North and South is important to understand before we can talk about the reasons and battles of the war.

·       T will have a student read the objective of the lesson: By the end of the lesson, SWBAT to understand what the focus of the unit is on.

Students:

·       Students will sit down at their appropriate seats.

·       Students will work through the sponge independently.

·       Students will call out what they know, and what they want to know about the Civil War.

Materials: KWL Chart, Paper, Pencil

 

Introduction to New Material: (25 minutes)

Teacher:

·       T will then explain that the first step in studying the Civil War is to figure out the reasons that the war started.

·       T will explain that wars don’t just happen out of nowhere – there are certain reasons that conflicts start.

·       T will turn on a PowerPoint entitled – “A Snapshot at America in the Mid 1800’s”

·       T will go through each slide in the PowerPoint. The PowerPoint will be focused on the Northern Region (their economy, culture, and geography), the Southern Region (their economy, culture, and geography).

·       T will ask the Ss to complete a graphic organizer that will make the Ss write down the key points from the presentation

·       T will stop after each slide and help prompt the students to answer the questions on their graphic organizers.

·       T will remind the students that the information on their graphic organizers are the key points of the lesson.

·       T will stop frequently to ask the Ss if they have any questions and perform informal checks of understanding.

·       T will also circulate the room to make sure that each student is writing their answers in the graphic organizer (T will particularly pay attention to those Ss that have shown needs of remediation).

Students:

·       Students will pay attention to the Power Point presentation

·       Students will ask any questions concerning the different regions.

·       Students will fill out their graphic organizers.

Materials: LCD, graphic organizer

Guided Practice: (15 minutes)

Teacher:

·       When the PowerPoint gets to slide that prompts the students to turn over their graphic organizers, T will have the students go back to their KWL charts and fill in the what they’ve learned section of the chart.

·       T will then post the KWL chart once again, and ask the Ss, “So far, what can we add to the KWL chart?”

·       T will look for responses such as “The North was full of factories and was not as full of farms as the South.” “The South had huge plantations and was known for growing cotton.” “There was a huge debate over the new states and whether they should be slave or free states.”

·       T will write down their responses on the class KWL chart.

·       T will make sure that the students are adding the classroom responses to their particular KWL chart.

·       T will review then KWL chart and ask the Ss to not lose their KWL chart so that future lessons they can add to the chart.

·       T will then have the students play the game on the PowerPoint involving the stories about people from different regions of the antebellum U.S.

·       T will use the activity as an informal check of understanding on the main concepts of the lesson.

·       T will pull those students that look to be struggling after the guided practice to review some of the key points.

Students:

·       Students will add to their KWL chart.

·       Students will play the game displayed in the PowerPoint.

·       Students will make sure to put their heads down when responded to the questions.

Materials: KWL Chart, LCD

 

Independent Practice: (30 minutes)

Teacher:

·       T will then hand out a Venn diagram with “North” labeled over one circle, and “South” labeled over the other circle.

·       T will also hand out the worksheet: “I am from the North… I am from the South…”

·       T will go to the proper slide on the PowerPoint that tells the Ss what to do during the Independent Practice.

·       T will ask the Ss how to use a Venn diagram.

·       T will explain that a Venn diagram compares and contrasts two different things. The information in the outer part of the circle show how the two things are different. The information in both of the circles shows how they are the same.

·       T will tell the Ss that they can use their notes to fill out the Venn diagram comparing the North and South prior to the Civil War.

·       T will also explain the directions for the worksheet titled, “I am from the North…I am from the South…”

·       T will go over the rubric included with the worksheet to make sure everyone understands the objective and expectations of the assignment.

·       T will ask the Ss to think about everything from their economy, culture, and geography.

·       T will circulate the room monitoring the Ss as they complete the Venn diagram.

·       T will also pull two to three Ss who have shown struggles to do the Venn diagram and worksheet as a small group with T’s guidance.

Students:

·       Ss will fill out the Venn Diagram

·       Ss will complete their worksheet.

·       Ss will ask questions if they have problems understanding what to do.

·       Ss will work quietly. 

Materials: Venn diagram, worksheet, LCD

 

Closing: (10 minutes)

Teacher:

·       As a closing, T will review the KWL Chart and have two to three students share out the information on their Venn diagrams and/or worksheet.

·       T will then have the students complete the exit ticket: “write down two differences between the North and South before the Civil War” (found on the PowerPoint).

·       T will then preview the next lesson by telling the Ss that they are going to look at the way Northerners thought prior to the Civil War.

·       T will review the key points of the lesson.

·       T will discuss the homework: “Either in your textbook or on the computer, research one leader of the Civil War to prepare yourself for the upcoming project.”

Student:

·       Students will share out their Venn diagrams and/or worksheets.

·       Students will listen to what the next lesson will be about.

·       Students will write down their homework.

Materials: Venn diagram, worksheet, KWL Chart

 

Homework:

“Either in your textbook or on the computer, research one leader of the Civil War to prepare yourself for the upcoming project.”

Teacher Reflections:
This lesson is action packed and has many different components. Because of this, I found it very important to be very prepared (copies made, and a detailed review of the material) for the lesson before beginning. When beginning the lesson, I noticed that the students had little to no knowledge of the Civil War. Any facts they thought they knew about the Civil War, from my experiences, are not accurate. Therefore, do not be surprised if the students don't have that much information to fill out in the KWL chart when first starting the unit.
During the introduction to new material portion of the lesson, I found it very important to continuously check for understanding. Any preconceived notions that I had about whether or not students knew the South was warmer than the North, and what urban and rural meant, I found to be on a whole, not true. 
In terms of the independent practice portion of the lesson, I found it to be very important to pull out the students that seemed to be struggling to understand the concepts during the independent and guided portions of the lesson. I brought them together in a small group and really worked with them to overcome certain vocabulary hurdles that were preventing them from truly internalizing the lesson. I found intervention to be especially important in this lesson, because without knowing the geographic, cultural, and economic conditions of the U.S. before the Civil War, students will not be able to understand the story of the Civil War. Instead, without this knowledge I have found a lot of students will attempt to memorize the story of the war instead of trying see the causes and effects that led to the various events. 

Lesson Resources

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