Video Diagnostic: Video Diagnostic oral_presentation__scale_.pdf

 
 
 
oral_presentation__scale_.pdf
Rubric
 
 
The oral presentation rubric we use was created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. Twelfth graders are scored in all seven domains of this rubric for major assessments like the Senior Research Project. This rubric allows for stronger vertical alignment throughout grades 9-12 and across multiple content areas.
  • Video Diagnostic oral_presentation__scale_.pdf
  • Video Diagnostic oral_presentation__scale_.pdf
Rubric
 
 
The oral presentation rubric we use was created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. Twelfth graders are scored in all seven domains of this rubric for major assessments like the Senior Research Project. This rubric allows for stronger vertical alignment throughout grades 9-12 and across multiple content areas.
 
Feedback Systems

Video Diagnostic

My students have a high-stakes oral defense of their senior research towards the end of the spring semester, and we prepare for that all year. The Video Diagnostic is a recording of each student’s starting point in the oral presentation process and an opportunity for students to see a snippet of their presentation "selves," what their peers see as their current strengths, and what their teacher sees as their current challenges. Each Video Diagnostic includes these three parts -- the oral presentation, peer feedback, and teacher feedback. These are then packaged into one short Video Diagnostic, uploaded, and shared to the student. The student watches it all and gets a clearer sense of how they appear to an audience in terms of their tone, inflection, pacing, and eye contact. I also have them watch these diagnostics a few weeks before the high-stakes presentation as a confidence booster because all of them will have made tremendous gains in their oral presentation skills from that first diagnostic to months later when they are finalizing their presentations at the end of the year.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
A student during his Video Diagnostic.
 
Rubric
 
 
The oral presentation rubric we use was created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. Twelfth graders are scored in all seven domains of this rubric for major assessments like the Senior Research Project. This rubric allows for stronger vertical alignment throughout grades 9-12 and across multiple content areas.
 
Students In Action
 
 
A student during his Video Diagnostic.
Rubric
 
 
The oral presentation rubric we use was created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. Twelfth graders are scored in all seven domains of this rubric for major assessments like the Senior Research Project. This rubric allows for stronger vertical alignment throughout grades 9-12 and across multiple content areas.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
Similar Strategies
Collaborative Student Groups
Moral Reasoning Conversation

A Moral Reasoning Conversation is a student grouping and discourse strategy that involves heterogeneous groups of 4-5 students holding table discussions about their responses to provocative questions that frame, go deeper with, or reflect on the day's lesson. This is an especially effective strategy to use when we are engaging with complex themes in the literature we are reading as a class. The purpose of Moral Reasoning Conversations is for my students to prepare the thoughts that they will introduce in a subsequent whole-class discussion or a more formal Socratic Seminar. The students are given a situation that asks them to use their individual moral compasses to determine how they would behave in a complex ethical context. They discuss these moral dilemmas with peers in their table groups. At key moments during the discussion, I introduce "wrenches" that add layers of complexity to the dilemmas and push students towards deeper critical thinking and consideration of multiple perspectives. I consider carefully how much detail to present regarding each initial moral dilemma, so that my students have the opportunity to develop their own "wrenches" for the Moral Reasoning Conversation. 

 
Feedback Systems
Partner Assessment

Our classroom is committed to being in the public eye, so that our work together has real-life meaning and authentic value. Thus, it is necessary that a culture is established in which everyone looks at each other as assets in the game where constructive criticism meets the oral presentation. This is key, especially in small groups when students will be giving peer-to-peer feedback and scoring each other on the same rubric that an outside audience will be using to score their presentation performance. When students do this kind of partner assessment, I find it most effective if the group only focuses on one or two of the rubric domains rather than the entire rubric. By concentrating their feedback, they are then able to take the next step -- developing a common and targeted set of strategies that they all can practice in order to become excellent oral presenters.

 
Instructional Closings
Debrief

As with the Warm-up activity that gets the brain going at the beginning of class, my students end class with an activity that lets them feel closure with the lesson and their work for that day. The activity is almost always an online reflective journal or survey, and the purpose is to have an impact on and inform my planning for the next class. Sometimes we end the period with a whole-class conversation instead, especially after a Socratic Seminar day, because we use the conversation to debrief and think metacognitively about our discussion process as a whole group. Students should develop metacognition skills as a way of understanding how they learn. The debrief looks at the learning process for the day and is that opportunity for me to point out how different students learned well because they have certain strategies they used effectively. In this way, more students can benefit from that reflection. Literacy development requires so many strategies that operate differently given the text. When my students can benefit from understanding how they each learn, a strong sense of community and collaboration develops.

 
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