Annotation Logs: Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf

 
 
 
Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Independent Student Learning

Annotation Logs

Annotation Logs in my class can be on paper or online, usually depending on what modality the student prefers, as well as what their access is to technology at home. Annotation Logs are a routine through which my students explore the unit text by analyzing quotes, asking questions, and making clarifications. Whether online or on paper, it is my routine to respond to their annotations. Because each student writes so many annotations throughout a unit, I have many opportunities to dip into their thinking at multiple points along the way. Annotation Logs are fundamental building blocks to some of my other classroom practices including Socratic Seminars, TIED analysis paragraphs, and essay writing. For each annotation in the log, my students must include their focus for the annotation, the quote itself, the page or line number, and the analysis. The focus of the annotation could be a literary device, a theme connection or an approach through one of the literary theory lenses we have studied. Citing the quote and where it is found makes for easy reference later on. The analysis is 3-4 sentences that shows how the quote addresses the initial focus they indicated. It is in this last part that I address any feedback by asking questions and clarifying any plot confusion.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
 
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
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