Annotation Logs: Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf

 
 
 
Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Independent Student Learning

Annotation Logs

Annotation Logs in my class can be on paper or online, usually depending on what modality the student prefers, as well as what their access is to technology at home. Annotation Logs are a routine through which my students explore the unit text by analyzing quotes, asking questions, and making clarifications. Whether online or on paper, it is my routine to respond to their annotations. Because each student writes so many annotations throughout a unit, I have many opportunities to dip into their thinking at multiple points along the way. Annotation Logs are fundamental building blocks to some of my other classroom practices including Socratic Seminars, TIED analysis paragraphs, and essay writing. For each annotation in the log, my students must include their focus for the annotation, the quote itself, the page or line number, and the analysis. The focus of the annotation could be a literary device, a theme connection or an approach through one of the literary theory lenses we have studied. Citing the quote and where it is found makes for easy reference later on. The analysis is 3-4 sentences that shows how the quote addresses the initial focus they indicated. It is in this last part that I address any feedback by asking questions and clarifying any plot confusion.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
 
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
Similar Strategies
Instructional Planning
Johanna's Approach to Planning

Planning is an essential part of a blended teacher’s practice. In blended environments, where students can be at different points in a course on various modalities, blended teachers need to be very intentional about how they plan. Check out the video below to see how Johanna plans for instruction in her blended classroom.

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Posters in Pairs

One of the most essential steps for a successful Socratic seminar is the preparation of evidence that each student will bring into these discussions. One of the ways we prepare is through Pair Posters followed by a Gallery Walk. To give context, the seminars are whole class and entirely student-facilitated. Given all of the personality dynamics at play during the actual seminar, coupled with the ever-present video camera recording their thoughtful conversation that will later be scripted, it is fundamental that the students ground their opinions and questions in the text in order for the seminar to be a positive learning experience. One method of preparation that helps them do this, and that also generates enthusiasm for this high-stakes discussion, is dividing the class into pairs to create quote posters. After each pair is assigned a literary device, they then use their Annotation Logs to select text evidence shows how the literary device functions. This involves conversation and negotiation between the pair who then have to use the device analysis to connect back to one of the themes we have been studying as a class and incorporate an image that illuminates that connection. The public nature of the gallery walk that ensues after the posters are completed ensures that student pairs also spend time polishing the final product. Their peers will then take pictures of all the posters and decide which ones they might want to use as part of their individual evidence preparation for the Socratic seminar.

 
Feedback Systems
Peer to Peer Scoring

Peer to Peer Scoring is a feedback strategy I use regularly to ensure that my students become comfortable with and skillful at giving and receiving feedback about their academic work. In most cases, I develop rubrics to assess a particular skill and I ask the students to use the rubrics to score their peers' work on a given assignment. This strategy creates a common understanding of high-quality academic performance and the standards we use to assess that quality. Peer to Peer Scoring affords my students multiple opportunities to explain clearly their reasons for coming to a particular assessment of their peers' work, thereby helping each student to internalize what rigorous intellectual work consists of. Peer to Peer Scoring is also an effective scaffolding strategy to prepare my students for their Senior Research Projects, a rigorous graduation requirement at our school that culminates in seniors getting feedback from community members.

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close