Collaborative Pre-Reading: Collaborative Pre-Reading

 
 
 
Collaborative Pre-Reading
Teacher In Action
 
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Instructional Openings

Collaborative Pre-Reading

My students generate questions before their computer-based blended learning sessions in order to guide their reading of a text through the virtual library, MyOn. They will use these class-generated questions as a reading strategy ("asking questions") in order to increase their comprehension and will give more explicit purpose to their reading. This simple strategy has helped my students be more focused and successful when they're reading independently on My On.

Strategy Resources (2)
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The "Asking WH- Questions" graphic organizer is a place for students to record their who, what, where, when, why, and how questions. These questions can be asked before, during, and after reading. I teach students that the answers to many "WH-" questions can be found in the text.
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The "Asking WH- Questions" graphic organizer is a place for students to record their who, what, where, when, why, and how questions. These questions can be asked before, during, and after reading. I teach students that the answers to many "WH-" questions can be found in the text.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Routines and Procedures
Computer Captains for Transitions

Computer Captains for Transitions is a routine I have developed that allows my students to take on an important peer leadership role that, at the same time, helps minimize the amount of time that my students spend in transition from working independently on a computer to joining their group on the rug for direct instruction or vice versa. Using the Computer Captains for Transitions strategy, which involves designated students alerting their peers to the timing of routinized whole-class transitions, allows my students to develop more ownership over their own learning and the culture of the class. Used in combination with timing transitions and re-doing unsuccessful transitions, this strategy has helped me re-capture critical learning time in my blended learning classroom. 

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Peer Tutoring on Computers

When a student is working on the computers, they may ask a peer for help if they haven't successfully figured out how to solve a problem. I emphasize trying something first on your paper to explain what you have tried to your buddy, and ask for ideas they may have. Given the adaptive nature of our BL software, many students are encountering difficult content. I want my students to teach each other how to overcome challenges and persevere. This helps to create a sense of unity along with our motivational BL wall. 

 
Whole-Group Instruction
Learning Journey Review

The Learning Journey Review is taking an essential question or a big idea from a content unit and making it visual for the students, usually in a chart or poster. The chart, illustrating a timeline or taxonomy chart, is created at the beginning of an ELA unit and is constantly referred to at the beginning of each week and at the end of the week, thereby helping to connect the week's lessons together.

 
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