Film Framing: Film Framing

 
 
 
Film Framing
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Film Framing

Film Framing uses animated films students often remember from childhood as a jumping-off point for approaching the serious and often emotionally tough conversations that we will be having later in the class period about the novel we are studying. Given their visual appeal and simple storylines, these films are one way to support my students as they grapple with complex questions and apply literary theories and devices. Part of the analysis process for my students is tracking their observations throughout each clip and using those notes during the class discussion that follows the viewing. The understanding they gain through the film discussion on how to answer these complex questions and apply multiple lenses is then applied to our class novel. An additional benefit of Film Framing is that my students become more critical consumers of media in general.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The notes template helps my students track their film observations and indicates which literary theory lens they will be using to analyze the clips they describe. The time stamp reiterates the importance of citation of evidence.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The notes template helps my students track their film observations and indicates which literary theory lens they will be using to analyze the clips they describe. The time stamp reiterates the importance of citation of evidence.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
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