Just the Facts: Just the Facts

 
 
 
Just the Facts
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Instructional Openings

Just the Facts

Just the Facts asks one to two students to summarize quickly the reading that will be used in the day's discussion. We follow a simple protocol of "Who + What"--citing which characters from the text did what significant actions in order to move the plot forward. When the initial student is finished sharing key facts from the reading, another student might be asked to fill in any other details. If there are plot details that are incorrect, it is an opportunity for other students to correct the errors. These "police report" type of summaries can be audio or video recorded, quickly edited, and then posted on to the class website as a more engaging way for students to review significant plot points from our class texts. Although there is an ideal reading pace at which I want students to move, some will be ahead of the reading calendar and some will be behind. Also, many students are anxious or reluctant to share out loud when it comes to analysis of the reading. Given that the Just the Facts reports the text's plot and simply the facts, more students are enthusiastic about sharing because the strategy allows different students to be the experts in relaying facts.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
This video shows different students reporting out one to two plot points from our class novel ("Native Son"). Different students are asked to film other students at their tables who are reporting out and those clips are quickly compiled into a short video summary that is then shared with the whole class.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
This video shows different students reporting out one to two plot points from our class novel ("Native Son"). Different students are asked to film other students at their tables who are reporting out and those clips are quickly compiled into a short video summary that is then shared with the whole class.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
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