Candy Land Path: Candy Land Path

 
 
 
Candy Land Path
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Academic Culture

Candy Land Path

The Candy Land Path is a Candy Land-style trail that runs across several walls in my classroom. Each tile on the trail represents a lesson my students have to master in order to advance in the course. This strategy allows my students' progress to be seen and followed on a day-to-day basis, ultimately giving transparency to the learning process. This is a powerful visual tool for every student - especially for over- and under-achievers - and allows me to reframe school as a learning journey and progression as opposed to just working for a grade. The Path also brings an element of fun to the classroom while preserving its motivational purpose. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a photo of my classroom that shows the Candy Land Path on the far wall. Students move their sticky notes from lesson to lesson along the Path as they master the content.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a photo of my classroom that shows the Candy Land Path on the far wall. Students move their sticky notes from lesson to lesson along the Path as they master the content.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Independent Student Learning
Answer Key

To give students greater independence, there is an answer key for the practice problems of every lesson. I know what a lot of teachers are thinking at this point: what if the student just copy all their answers from the answer key? As an Algebra teacher told me when I asked them the same question before starting flipped mastery, they'll just fail the mastery quiz. It only takes a few correctional assignments for them to realize that the answer key is there to check answers, not copy them.

 
Academic Culture
Four Rules

There are only 4 rules in my classroom. The four rules are 1) Be respectful - I will always talk to students respectfully so there is no reason for students to talk to either myself of their peers with disrepect. 2) Always sit in your assigned seat - seating assignments are always projected in the front of the room so there is no reason to be confused about where to sit. No negotiations. 3) No talking during independent time - this doesn't need much explanation. 4) Technology is used for learning. Their devices should only be used to watch instructional videos otherwise it's too easy to get sucked into the vast abyss of the internet.


 
Instructional Planning
Ben's Approach to Planning

Planning is an essential part of a blended teacher’s practice. In blended environments, where students can be at different points in a course on various modalities, blended teachers need to be very intentional about how they plan. Check out the video below to see how Ben plans for instruction in his blended classroom.


 
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