Laser Transitions: Laser Transitions

 
 
 
Laser Transitions
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Routines and Procedures

Laser Transitions

Laser Transitions is a silent way for me to signal to my students that it is time for them to transition off of the computers to a different station. Using this strategy I am able to cue students on the computers while I continue to wrap things up with my students who are either in a mini-lesson with me or at another workstation. This strategy helps me support my students to stay on task until the end of a rotation and to transition smoothly from one station to another.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is an image of the laser pointer I utilize to get my students' attention quickly and silently. When they see the light from this laser pointer, they efficiently stop what they're doing and understand it is time to move onto the next task.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is an image of the laser pointer I utilize to get my students' attention quickly and silently. When they see the light from this laser pointer, they efficiently stop what they're doing and understand it is time to move onto the next task.
Raul Gonzalez
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
First grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Shared Inquiry Trackers

This is an excel document that is projected during shared inquiry. Each time that a student shares a comment, question, or any other type of substantial response in the group's conversation, a cell is filled to create a bar graph that is easily identifiable by students. It informs them and myself about the participation levels and motivates students to give more to a conversation. 

 
Assessment & Data
Thumbs Up, I Get This!

I make sure that my students have heard the directions I've given using this simple but effective check for understanding strategy. Having students repeat directions or an expectation provides them with an opportunity to re-state or clarify their understanding. For example, if a student responds incorrectly, I don't just move on to another student all the time. I ask the same question in a different way so that my student who initially responded incorrectly, unclearly, or incompletely has another opportunity to answer with more clarity. Thumbs Up, I Get This! is another way to hold students accountable during their independent time. 

 
Independent Student Learning
Self Monitoring Thumbs

One of my goals as a first grade teacher is to develop independent learners that can problem solve or decide when it is time to request assistance from others. Self-reliance is a need that many parents talk to me about during conferences and as a result, I've turned to two different strategies in the classroom that allow students to continue their work while informing me of their comfort level of the task. These strategies are known as self monitoring tools that help me to prioritize which students I need to assist first. 


 
 
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