Grade Contracts: Grade Contract Feedback 3.png

 
 
 
Feedback 3.png
Student Data
 
 
This screenshot shows a filled in grade contract. During a class period as I’m moving through the class, students are using their quest contracts to navigate through the levels. They keep track of battles they’ve completed and show me any of the work they’ve completed. I assess their battles using the scale captain (mastered), mate (almost mastered), and deckhand (not mastered). All students’ battles must be marked off as captain before they can level-up.
  • Grade Contract Feedback 3.png
Student Data
 
 
This screenshot shows a filled in grade contract. During a class period as I’m moving through the class, students are using their quest contracts to navigate through the levels. They keep track of battles they’ve completed and show me any of the work they’ve completed. I assess their battles using the scale captain (mastered), mate (almost mastered), and deckhand (not mastered). All students’ battles must be marked off as captain before they can level-up.
 
Feedback Systems

Grade Contracts

Grade Contracts are a strategy I use to assess my students' progress towards mastery of defined sets of content and skill objectives and to provide feedback on their development at the end of each level in my blended learning class. Students review the mastery requirements for each level and decide whether they will pursue an "A," "B," "C," or "D" contract; in so doing, they understand and commit to what they must know and be able to do in order to earn the letter grade of the contracts they have chosen. Grade Contracts eliminate the superficiality of number grades on individual assignments and focus my students' attention on authentic demonstrations of mastery over time. This strategy also empowers my students to challenge themselves and to monitor and take responsibility for their own learning, which is an essential mindset shift in my largely self-paced class.  

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher In Action
 
 
Rubric
 
 
This Level 2 contract illustrates how each level is set up. The contract gives students four different grade options to choose from; each have varying requirements. The students are given a choice in the optional activities they complete and the contract they choose. If my students master the material in the contract, they receive the grade associated with that contract.
Student Data
 
 
This screenshot shows a filled in grade contract. During a class period as I’m moving through the class, students are using their quest contracts to navigate through the levels. They keep track of battles they’ve completed and show me any of the work they’ve completed. I assess their battles using the scale captain (mastered), mate (almost mastered), and deckhand (not mastered). All students’ battles must be marked off as captain before they can level-up.
Teacher In Action
 
 
Rubric
 
 
This Level 2 contract illustrates how each level is set up. The contract gives students four different grade options to choose from; each have varying requirements. The students are given a choice in the optional activities they complete and the contract they choose. If my students master the material in the contract, they receive the grade associated with that contract.
Student Data
 
 
This screenshot shows a filled in grade contract. During a class period as I’m moving through the class, students are using their quest contracts to navigate through the levels. They keep track of battles they’ve completed and show me any of the work they’ve completed. I assess their battles using the scale captain (mastered), mate (almost mastered), and deckhand (not mastered). All students’ battles must be marked off as captain before they can level-up.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Assessment & Data
Battling the Boss

Battling the Boss is a formative assessment strategy I use at the end of almost every level in our academic game. It's a process that allows students to prove that they understand the material covered in each level. Battling the Boss usually consists of me asking the student who has indicated that s/he is ready to "battle" one or two questions that require the student to demonstrate the skills I'm looking for them to develop in the level. If students prove that they understand the material, I let them move onto the next level. The students then put their names on the next level's poster, which is a public demonstration of each student's progress in the course. If students are not successful, they have the opportunity to do additional preparation and Battle the Boss when they have mastered the content.  

 
Time and Space
Music Time Indicator

Music is used to transition students at the beginning and end of the class period. Students spend the first four minutes of class logging into their learning management system Haiku and Classcraft account (gamification platform). We have established as a class that all iPads (we are 1:1) should be charged and open during this period of time. This length of time is indicated by a 4:34 minute clip of music. During this time, I take attendance, fill out advanced make-ups, and talk to students who have been absent or have questions.The last three minutes in our class are indicated by transition music. This music lasts 2 minutes. It indicates that students can log out of Haiku, close their apps and their iPads. If students are in the middle of an activity, they wrap-up what they are working on either by saving it as a draft or submitting their assignment. If students close their iPads before the music sounds and have stopped working, they are deducted health points (HP) on Classcraft. I do this because I want students to use every minute for learning as I would if I was using direct instruction in my class.

 
Academic Culture
Leaderboard

The leaderboard is a display of both academic and behavioral progress for my students. The results are tabulated separately in the academic and behavioral games. In the academic game, the focus is on the experience points earned by students in academic activities. Experience points in the academic game are only awarded to students once they have mastered an activity. Once they have mastered the activity, points are added to the leaderboard. We review the academic leaderboard and recognize individuals who have made it to the top or who have made significant progress in the class. For the leaderboard in the behavior game, I use Classcraft to display students' points. This display can be sorted by experience points, health points, or action points depending on what is the required view. From my experience, the two leaderboards help steer a cooperative sense of competition among a lot of my students. It also motivates them to continue learning and sharing. Although much of this is external motivation at the beginning of the year, I see a shift towards internal motivation in regards to behavior and academic progress as the year continues. Students are much more willing to learn for learning's sake instead of a prize or written/verbal recognition as they become more accustomed to these behavior and academic qualities. The academic leaderboard displays the rankings of students in all three of my earth science classes. The behavior game on Classcraft is solely based on the students in that particular period.

 
 
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