Gamification: GamificationScreencast.mp4

 
 
 
Classcraftevent.mp4
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast demonstrates how I use Classcraft events to add an element of chance to our behavioral game. The random events can be positive or negative, giving students XP or HP as a result. The event can be anything you choose. One event that I particularly enjoy is when my entire class must use non-verbal communication the entire class period.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast demonstrates how I use Classcraft events to add an element of chance to our behavioral game. The random events can be positive or negative, giving students XP or HP as a result. The event can be anything you choose. One event that I particularly enjoy is when my entire class must use non-verbal communication the entire class period.
 
Academic Culture

Gamification

Motivating students to improve behavior and engage in self-directed learning

Gamification is the process of adding game elements to an environment that is not traditionally a game. I use Gamification as a strategy in my blended learning classroom to motivate my ninth grade students to engage in the curriculum and to buy in to my social and behavioral expectations--all while keeping learning fun! We have two games going on in our classroom---our academic game and our behavioral game. Our academic game is based around the storyline of the Isle of Nosredna and features an island-based theme with a leaderboard ranking based on students' engagement in our self-paced learning environment. Our behavioral game, using the Classcraft online tool, is based on health points, experience points, battles, and powers. Students work as teams to keep each other "alive" and progressing in both games.  

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast demonstrates how I use Classcraft events to add an element of chance to our behavioral game. The random events can be positive or negative, giving students XP or HP as a result. The event can be anything you choose. One event that I particularly enjoy is when my entire class must use non-verbal communication the entire class period.
Article
 
 
The first blog post discusses the early excitement within the classroom as game elements were introduced to my students. The second blog post reflects on the elements of gamification I have implemented in my classroom, the three things I've noticed after implementation, and the differences between my behavioral and academic games.
Teacher In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast demonstrates how I use Classcraft events to add an element of chance to our behavioral game. The random events can be positive or negative, giving students XP or HP as a result. The event can be anything you choose. One event that I particularly enjoy is when my entire class must use non-verbal communication the entire class period.
Article
 
 
The first blog post discusses the early excitement within the classroom as game elements were introduced to my students. The second blog post reflects on the elements of gamification I have implemented in my classroom, the three things I've noticed after implementation, and the differences between my behavioral and academic games.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Treasure Map
Motivating students to improve behavior and engage in self-directed learning

The Treasure Map is a strategy I use to help my students progress through levels in a self-paced environment without setting deadlines for them. My students record when they start a level and when they end a level. If they complete the level in a given amount of time, they receive a piece of the Treasure Map. When my students complete four levels within the given time, they earn a free A (like contracting for an A). This strategy would also work with other forms of rewards, not just awards linked to a grade or extra credit.

 
Time and Space
Classroom Zones
Motivating students to improve behavior and engage in self-directed learning

My classroom space is broken into five distinct areas based on students’ needs. The areas are named in accordance with the storyline in our academic game: (1) presentation area (also known as the shelter), (2) lounge area (the beach), (3) counter area (the lookout), (4) teacher area (crash site), and the (5) table area (the jungle). Each area was set up with a distinct vision in mind. The shelter was set-up with two futons and a coffee table all located around the SmartBoard at the front of the classroom. I envisioned this area as a place where student groups could share their learning and present content using their iPads and our Apple TV. The beach area was created to help those students who do better lounging on a couch or in a non-traditional chair while working. I wanted my room to represent the traditional as well as the “non-traditional” student. The lookout area was specifically set-up for students who enjoy to look outside and see nature as they work. It also works well for those who use scenery as a reset in an environment that is often controlled chaos. The crash site was created as a result of the storyline where all students became Plane Crash Survivors (PCSs). The name makes it okay to have a messy desk! It’s also used as a space to separate distracting students from the attention of others in the classroom. Finally, the table area was made for the more traditional student who likes to work at a table or desk or likes to have a hard surface to work on. Throughout class, students can be seen moving throughout the room in accordance with their needs as a learner at that particular moment. I feel the incorporation of the different areas of the classroom helps to build a culture of learning acceptance and risk. It opens up the classroom to being more than just a sit and get environment. It helps to personalize and shape students’ learning. See also Jessi's Overview Model.

 
Assessment & Data
Socrative Digital Assessment Tool
Motivating students to improve behavior and engage in self-directed learning

Socrative is a Digital Assessment tool I use to conduct formative assessments. For example, during a recent activity I used socrative to assess students' misconceptions or misunderstandings about porosity and permeability when discussing groundwater. The students took the four question quiz and the results were displayed on the board for students and myself to view. From the data I was able to make decisions about my teaching in the next 40 minutes based on the results of the quiz. As a blended learning teacher, I particularly like Socrative as a formative assessment tool because it lets me choose how I my students will be assessed. I can choose to have them do it self-paced, to give instant feedback, or to guide the entire quiz myself. I love the flexibility in this tool and the instant data I receive from it. 

 
 
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