Heads Together: Heads together sample pics.pdf

 
 
 
Heads together sample pics.pdf
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This routine is called "Heads Together". When students are working in their small group teams they start the lesson or end it by putting their heads together to discuss a question, brainstorm ideas, provide each other feedback/compliments, give each other advice, or decide/agree on a response collaboratively.
  • Heads together sample pics.pdf
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This routine is called "Heads Together". When students are working in their small group teams they start the lesson or end it by putting their heads together to discuss a question, brainstorm ideas, provide each other feedback/compliments, give each other advice, or decide/agree on a response collaboratively.
 
Routines and Procedures

Heads Together

In the Heads Together strategy, my students huddle in pre-determined teams at the beginning or end of a lesson to discuss a question, give each other advice, or decide on a response collaboratively. I use this quick strategy to give my students consistent opportunities to engage in productive group work throughout each class period.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This routine is called "Heads Together". When students are working in their small group teams they start the lesson or end it by putting their heads together to discuss a question, brainstorm ideas, provide each other feedback/compliments, give each other advice, or decide/agree on a response collaboratively.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This routine is called "Heads Together". When students are working in their small group teams they start the lesson or end it by putting their heads together to discuss a question, brainstorm ideas, provide each other feedback/compliments, give each other advice, or decide/agree on a response collaboratively.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Collaborative Student Groups
Color Teams

Color Teams are teams that students form themselves within the rotation groups that I have created. Students usually work in their Color Teams when we conduct a group task. When students are working in their teams, I encourage them to use academic discourse and math vocabulary words. Given that students spend a significant amount of time working independently on digital content in my blended classroom, Color Teams are an important structure to foster productive group work among my students.

 
Instructional Openings
Know, Want to Know, Solve

KWS stands for what we Know, Want to know, and how might we Solve a word problem. The KWS Chart is a catalyst that gets my students to organize and analyze complex word problems. My students are more successful with word problems when they have a toolkit for simplifying the complex information often found within word problems. This tool is an essential scaffold for English Language Learners in my class. The strategy is also great to uncover with my students the fact that there are multiple ways of solving a problem, no matter how complex it may be, and often times there may be multiple routes to a solution.  

 
Feedback Systems
Teamwork Self-Assessment Rubric

At the conclusion of our team sessions my students self-assess, give feedback/compliments to one another, and agree or share out their disagreements with one another. Our two areas of focus right now are collaboration and accountability. My students score themselves on a scale from 1-4 on these habits and then track their progress daily/weekly in order to consider their next steps or provide feedback to one another. Perhaps most importantly, the sentence stems within the rubric help my students develop a repertoire of conversational skills they will need in the 21st century and beyond.  

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close