Mastery Zone: Mastery Zone Class Rotation.pdf

 
 
 
Class Rotation.pdf
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
  • Mastery Zone Class Rotation.pdf
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
 
Assessment & Data

Mastery Zone

My blended classroom is based on the Flipped Mastery model (please see the "Introduction to Mastery Based Learning" strategy video). When my students think that they have mastered the skills and concepts in a particular lesson, they show their completed notes to me or my co-teacher and get a Mastery Quiz. Students then head to the Mastery Zone, which is a section of the classroom reserved for students taking Mastery Quizzes and Level Tests. There is no talking in the Mastery Zone and the only technology permitted is a calculator. If they achieve at an 80% or higher rate, students move forward in the curriculum. If not, they review the concepts and materials in the lesson and re-take the Mastery Quiz in the Mastery Zone when they are ready. The Mastery Zone assessment strategy is a concept I adapted from the Algebros Flipped Mastery program.

Strategy Resources (4)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Flipped Mastery Model

I use a Flipped Mastery model of instruction. In this model, students watch videos of lessons that I have recorded and posted on the class website, answer a set of practice problems to hone their skills, and take a Mastery Quiz when they feel ready to show they have mastered the material. I provide 1:1 coaching and support throughout the process. If students pass a quiz, they move onto the next lesson. If they fail, they are required to do another practice assignment before re-trying the quiz.  There is no failing in my class.  Either you know something or you’re still learning how to do that thing, but there’s no in-between.

Number of Students: ~22-28 students

Number of Adults: two teachers (co-teaching model)

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 110 minutes

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: IXL; SMART Notebook; Screencast-O-Matic; Weebly; PowerSchool; Kahoot!; Google Forms

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: SMARTboard; Wacom Tablet; Amplify Teacher Tablet (for teacher); Mac PowerBook (for teacher)

Key Features: flipped-mastery; competency-based; student agency; co-teaching

 
Instructional Planning
Ben's Approach to Planning

Planning is an essential part of a blended teacher’s practice. In blended environments, where students can be at different points in a course on various modalities, blended teachers need to be very intentional about how they plan. Check out the video below to see how Ben plans for instruction in his blended classroom.


 
Routines and Procedures
Scholar Dollars

Keeping students motivated is very important in a self-paced course. Scholar Dollars is a strategy I developed to reward my students for working hard and making progress in the course. The concept of Scholar Dollars is pretty simple. Every time a student passes a Mastery Quiz, they receive five Scholar Dollars. Students receive 15 Scholar Dollars for passing a Level Test. Scholar Dollars can be used to buy school supplies, snacks, or even a pizza party. On random days, I switch up the payouts on Scholar Dollars - doubling the amount given, only paying for 100s on Mastery Quizzes or Level Tests, or giving all the Scholar Dollars earned on that day to one lucky student picked by lottery at the end of class.  

 
 
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