Mastery Zone: MasteryZoneArtifact1.JPG

 
 
 
MasteryZoneArtifact1.JPG
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
  • MasteryZoneArtifact1.JPG
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
 
Assessment & Data

Mastery Zone

My blended classroom is based on the Flipped Mastery model (please see the "Introduction to Mastery Based Learning" strategy video). When my students think that they have mastered the skills and concepts in a particular lesson, they show their completed notes to me or my co-teacher and get a Mastery Quiz. Students then head to the Mastery Zone, which is a section of the classroom reserved for students taking Mastery Quizzes and Level Tests. There is no talking in the Mastery Zone and the only technology permitted is a calculator. If they achieve at an 80% or higher rate, students move forward in the curriculum. If not, they review the concepts and materials in the lesson and re-take the Mastery Quiz in the Mastery Zone when they are ready. The Mastery Zone assessment strategy is a concept I adapted from the Algebros Flipped Mastery program.

Strategy Resources (4)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Independent Student Learning
Weekly Online Goal Setting

Students set weekly goals via Google Forms every Monday and reflect on if they meet these goals at the end of each week. This is a reflective process where students are asked questions that allow them to understand what factors contribute to their success or failure in the class. It also gives me a document I can refer to if I see students are consistently not meeting their own goals.

 
Assessment & Data
Student Lab Development Rubric

By allowing my students to assess other students' work and then providing them with a Student Lab Development Rubric to evaluate their own work, they learn to design and refine high-quality experimental procedures. The Student Lab Development Rubric is one of the tools I use to help students build the experiments they've created and then display results and lab analyses. When students are the ones dictating how they will conduct their experiments, they invest more fully in the activity and come to realize that science involves constant critical analysis and reiteration. I like to move conversations away from "right" and "wrong" and more towards how we can improve each component of our lab activities. Initially, some students feel uncomfortable identifying that their work isn't up to the high standards of the rubric, but over time most come to realize that this process helps them improve their final products and understand the underlying purpose behind labs.

 
Academic Culture
Station Expectations

Students in my self-paced blended classroom work in groups every day to complete a series of activities we call "Learning Stations." Learning Stations provide multiple ways in which my students can demonstrate mastery and build a digital portfolio of content to draw on throughout the year. By creating groups in which my students are paired up according to their supported reading and lexile levels, I foster a collaborative culture in which students don't feel singled out and high quality products can be produced by all groups. To alleviate the stress that sometimes accompanies engagement with highly targeted, rigorous activities, I allow my students to choose Station activities that most appropriately address the Learning Targets (please see the "Learning Targets" strategy video) they might struggle with or want to improve in. Reinforcing Station Expectations with explicit instructions at the beginning of each class is a strategy that ensures that my students understand what is expected of them during the period.

 
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