Teamwork Self-Assessment Rubric: Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf

 
 
 
Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
  • Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
 
Feedback Systems

Teamwork Self-Assessment Rubric

At the conclusion of our team sessions my students self-assess, give feedback/compliments to one another, and agree or share out their disagreements with one another. Our two areas of focus right now are collaboration and accountability. My students score themselves on a scale from 1-4 on these habits and then track their progress daily/weekly in order to consider their next steps or provide feedback to one another. Perhaps most importantly, the sentence stems within the rubric help my students develop a repertoire of conversational skills they will need in the 21st century and beyond.  

Strategy Resources (2)
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
 
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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Feedback Systems
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Main Idea Think Pair Share

Many teachers--myself included--utilize a version of the Think Pair Share strategy to give students opportunities for social learning and to build a culture of classroom community that includes respectful academic discourse. I use the Main Idea Think Pair Share strategy to ensure that my students are able to identify and articulate the main ideas of texts we are reading, which is one of the most foundational literacy skills that all effective readers must develop. I find that it can be helpful to use scaffolds like sentence stems and a variety of starting approaches (e.g., "the student with the longest hair speaks first") to ensure that this strategy remains fresh and accessible to my students, many of whom are English Language Learners.

 
 
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