Know, Want to Know, Solve: KWS Math journal shoot #2.pdf

 
 
 
KWS Math journal shoot #2.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
I use the an on-screen timer to check in and keep students focused on keeping their reflections brief and to the point. Often times I also use sentence stems depending on the problem we are looking at.
  • KWS Math journal shoot #2.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
I use the an on-screen timer to check in and keep students focused on keeping their reflections brief and to the point. Often times I also use sentence stems depending on the problem we are looking at.
 
Instructional Openings

Know, Want to Know, Solve

KWS stands for what we Know, Want to know, and how might we Solve a word problem. The KWS Chart is a catalyst that gets my students to organize and analyze complex word problems. My students are more successful with word problems when they have a toolkit for simplifying the complex information often found within word problems. This tool is an essential scaffold for English Language Learners in my class. The strategy is also great to uncover with my students the fact that there are multiple ways of solving a problem, no matter how complex it may be, and often times there may be multiple routes to a solution.  

Strategy Resources (2)
Student Handout
 
 
I use the an on-screen timer to check in and keep students focused on keeping their reflections brief and to the point. Often times I also use sentence stems depending on the problem we are looking at.
 
Student Handout
 
 
I use the an on-screen timer to check in and keep students focused on keeping their reflections brief and to the point. Often times I also use sentence stems depending on the problem we are looking at.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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Routines and Procedures
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Instructional Openings
Collaborative Pre-Reading

My students generate questions before their computer-based blended learning sessions in order to guide their reading of a text through the virtual library, MyOn. They will use these class-generated questions as a reading strategy ("asking questions") in order to increase their comprehension and will give more explicit purpose to their reading. This simple strategy has helped my students be more focused and successful when they're reading independently on My On.

 
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Start, Result, Change

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