"Look At Your Notes": Look At Your Notes2.mp4

 
 
 
Look At Your Notes2.mp4
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
 
Independent Student Learning

"Look At Your Notes"

The most common answer I give students when they ask me a question is "look at your notes." The course is designed so any question in the practice problems or mastery quiz have been directly addressed on the current video lesson or a past one. Because the design of the lessons has been created with this intentionality, it's easy to refer students to the exact place in the notes they can find their answer. It's been a challenge to not jump in and immediately offer students help, and many get frustrated in the moment, but over the course of the year students develop strong independence in their learning, able to use their notes, peers, and online resources to find the answer they were looking for.


Strategy Resources (3)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
Student Handout
 
 
The mastery quizzes correspond closely to notes and practice. It's a fair system, and if students fail a mastery quiz it is usually because they hadn't looked over their notes closely rather than some deep conceptual misunderstanding. As the year progresses, they begin to realize the correlation and see the value in studying their notes.
Student Handout
 
 
Lesson packet that includes lesson notes and independent practice. If you look, there is a strong correspondence between the notes and the practice problems. If a student is having a problem, I can usually just refer them to a problem from the notes rather than reexplain the concept. As the year progresses, students begin to start looking at the notes closer before asking a question.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
Student Handout
 
 
The mastery quizzes correspond closely to notes and practice. It's a fair system, and if students fail a mastery quiz it is usually because they hadn't looked over their notes closely rather than some deep conceptual misunderstanding. As the year progresses, they begin to realize the correlation and see the value in studying their notes.
Student Handout
 
 
Lesson packet that includes lesson notes and independent practice. If you look, there is a strong correspondence between the notes and the practice problems. If a student is having a problem, I can usually just refer them to a problem from the notes rather than reexplain the concept. As the year progresses, students begin to start looking at the notes closer before asking a question.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
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