Blended Learning Self-Monitoring: -self monitoring @ laptops sample.mp4

 
 
 
-self monitoring @ laptops sample.mp4
Students In Action
 
 
Video sample of students self-monitoring.
Students In Action
 
 
Video sample of students self-monitoring.
 
Routines and Procedures

Blended Learning Self-Monitoring

Students self monitoring- At the closing of each session students turns and talk to their neighbor about how their session went, what went well, and what a challenge was. This is done so students have support for their sessions, and so the teacher can visually evaluate how the students feel they are doing. The self monitoring also helps students consider what their next steps should be, as well as offer up suggestions on who to ask for help with certain lessons or who the 'ask an expert' go to would be. 


Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
Video sample of students self-monitoring.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The student desks each have their own labeled and initialed headphone buckets. Each student also has a self monitoring clothespin with their picture to move their clip according to how they felt their session went. This is a great informal way for the students and teacher to know how students are doing.
Poster
 
 
These sentence stems are used as descriptors for students to evaluate themselves. These descriptors are student friendly and instill a sense of purpose and reflection for students.
Students In Action
 
 
Video sample of students self-monitoring.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The student desks each have their own labeled and initialed headphone buckets. Each student also has a self monitoring clothespin with their picture to move their clip according to how they felt their session went. This is a great informal way for the students and teacher to know how students are doing.
Poster
 
 
These sentence stems are used as descriptors for students to evaluate themselves. These descriptors are student friendly and instill a sense of purpose and reflection for students.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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Routines and Procedures
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Observation charts are a type of inquiry chart that stimulate students’ curiosity. They build background information while providing teachers with a diagnostic tool. And they provide opportunities for language support from peers. During an observation chart, I use real pictures or paintings attached to white poster paper or butcher paper that contain a theme (e.g., food from a culture, ways of transportation, games a culture plays, etc.). My students walk around from observation chart to observation chart and write down either a question they're wondering about, a comment they'd like to make, or just an observation (i.e., statement of fact).  

 
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