Observation Chart: Observation Chart

 
 
 
Observation Chart
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Observation Chart

Observation charts are a type of inquiry chart that stimulate students’ curiosity. They build background information while providing teachers with a diagnostic tool. And they provide opportunities for language support from peers. During an observation chart, I use real pictures or paintings attached to white poster paper or butcher paper that contain a theme (e.g., food from a culture, ways of transportation, games a culture plays, etc.). My students walk around from observation chart to observation chart and write down either a question they're wondering about, a comment they'd like to make, or just an observation (i.e., statement of fact).  

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
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