Observation Chart: ObservationCharts_Directions.docx

 
 
 
ObservationCharts_Directions.docx
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
  • ObservationCharts_Directions.docx
  • ObservationCharts_Directions.docx
  • ObservationCharts_Directions.docx
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Observation Chart

Observation charts are a type of inquiry chart that stimulate students’ curiosity. They build background information while providing teachers with a diagnostic tool. And they provide opportunities for language support from peers. During an observation chart, I use real pictures or paintings attached to white poster paper or butcher paper that contain a theme (e.g., food from a culture, ways of transportation, games a culture plays, etc.). My students walk around from observation chart to observation chart and write down either a question they're wondering about, a comment they'd like to make, or just an observation (i.e., statement of fact).  

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Observation charts are a great way to engage students in learning new content, as it allows them to observe real images from the content being learned, to make observations, ask questions, and make comments about what they are observing. This document outlines how to implement this strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of observation charts. Use this as a diagnostic tool to gather information on what your students already know. Also, refer to them throughout the unit to change, revise, or add onto the charts as they are learning the content.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Collaborative Student Groups
Peer Support on Computers

In my class, students are allowed to offer peer support on the computers. My students identify what is a problem or a need they have and it is my job to identify who might be their support. This has helped my students offer guidance and help in a structured way. Peer support on the computers has helped with increasing academic discourse and social interactions as well as give a structured place for students to provide assistance to each other. Cooperative learning and reciprocal teaching are benefits to this strategy as well.

 
Routines and Procedures
Blended Learning Time-Keepers

This strategy is called Blended Learning Timekeeper. The BL Timekeeper circulates and focuses on looking for students who are moving with urgency and purpose. This strategy emphasizes focus and motivation. Since we implemented this strategy in our class, the students are logging on faster, as they want to be an 'urgency all-star'. 

 
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Rotation Enables Small Group Lessons

At Aspire Titan Academy, we use a rotational model where some students engage with interactive software, enabling small group lessons for others. Our students have 90 to 120 minutes of individual computer time daily. Our rotational model is currently evolving to use more programs and create more rotations. The goal is to increase the opportunities for small group instruction where we can better meet individual needs.

Number of Students: 26 students

Number of Adults: one teacher; various other adults support during specific times (e.g., Blended Learning Coordinator, Special Education Teachers, etc.)

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 60 minutes--two 30  minute rotations (Math Block)

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: DreamBox

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: Lenovo ThinkPads (1:2 ratio); SMARTboard; Document Camera; iPad (for teacher)

Key Features: station rotation; student agency


 
 
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