Collaborative Hand Signals: ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf

 
 
 
ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
 
Academic Culture

Collaborative Hand Signals

Students communicate nonverbally through their hands that they agree, disagree, or want to add onto what someone previously said. Just think for a minute the amount of time we as teachers stop for interruptions. This strategy shows us that there are ways to effectively communicate with each other silently.

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Poster
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Poster
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Blended Learning Data Share

This (bi-weekly/tri-weekly) strategy is used to incentivize, motivate, and support my students in truly taking ownership for their own learning. During each Blended Learning Data Chat, I recognize students who are consistently performing at the highest levels (Top-5) per program with a certificate and a small prize of their choice like a book, poster, or eraser. I then have the highest performing students come up so we can take a group selfie (with a selfie stick, of course), and then print each student a copy of the picture. The last part of the Blended Learning Data Chat is the recognition and celebration of our top performers who receive a certificate and take a picture to take home. They also receive a poster, eraser, book, or small prize of their choice for their effort and consistency. 

 
Independent Student Learning
Computer Support Hand Signals

Computer support hand signals are a way for students to nonverbally communicate a need while on the computers. It may be that they have tech issues or perhaps they need help with a lesson. Students hold two fingers up in the air and they wait for either the computer captain, which is a student role, the teacher, or the blended learning coordinator to offer assistance.

 
Small-Group Instruction
Small Group Intervention

This strategy is a small group guided instruction, or in student friendly language, team time with Mr. Esparza. A group of 3-4 students is pulled as other teams are conducting a differentiated math investigation. Students are given a selection of materials to create models and formulate ideas. We work as a collective to identify our misconceptions by asking ourselves questions, explaining why, and checking for understanding. As a scaffold, students use hand signals and our learning goal success rubrics to check themselves for understanding throughout the process.

 
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