Video Self-Assessment: Highlight Reel DEANTAE2014-15.m4v

 
 
 
Highlight Reel DEANTAE KENNEDY 2014-15.m4v
Students In Action
 
 
I record video clips to create a "Highlight Reel" for each student that captures their oral presentation skill development. These clips are taken during practices and the final performance, as well as during Socratic seminars. I use a simple program like iMovie to produce these Highlight Reels and then share them to a class folder. My students have access to each others Highlight Reels because it allows them to see different peer models of the same skill, such as use of inflection or eye contact.
Students In Action
 
 
I record video clips to create a "Highlight Reel" for each student that captures their oral presentation skill development. These clips are taken during practices and the final performance, as well as during Socratic seminars. I use a simple program like iMovie to produce these Highlight Reels and then share them to a class folder. My students have access to each others Highlight Reels because it allows them to see different peer models of the same skill, such as use of inflection or eye contact.
 
Feedback Systems

Video Self-Assessment

A valuable routine not only for my students but for my own learning as well is the use of video recording in the classroom. Key events to record are our academic discussions, their individual oral presentations, and as much as possible, their learning process as they build their skills. My students have a Senior Capstone Project and are expected to be able to present their research findings in both live and digital form. This is one example of a project where video recording becomes a necessary tool. From day one of the school year, the video camera slowly becomes a part of the village that is my classroom. Before students are recorded themselves, I show a significant amount of footage from previous years, whether it be past seniors giving advice about student mindset or a snapshot of a Socratic seminar. Students learn quickly that the video camera can be an amazing tool for helping them to become excellent presenters, and we discuss its value in capturing individual "isms" where a student has a particular presentation habit that needs adjusting. I also find it useful to record students giving each other peer feedback in addition to my own feedback. There is an added level of accountability when students know their feedback will also be recorded, which then leads students to focus on the language of the rubric to understand what is truly being assessed. 


Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
I record video clips to create a "Highlight Reel" for each student that captures their oral presentation skill development. These clips are taken during practices and the final performance, as well as during Socratic seminars. I use a simple program like iMovie to produce these Highlight Reels and then share them to a class folder. My students have access to each others Highlight Reels because it allows them to see different peer models of the same skill, such as use of inflection or eye contact.
Rubric
 
 
Students are also recorded giving feedback to their peers using the Oral Presentation Rubric as a guide. This allows students to better internalize the expectations of the oral presentation for themselves. We spend a significant amount of time focused on the "Presentation Skills" and "Use of Digital Media" domains when giving peer-to-peer feedback.
Students In Action
 
 
I record video clips to create a "Highlight Reel" for each student that captures their oral presentation skill development. These clips are taken during practices and the final performance, as well as during Socratic seminars. I use a simple program like iMovie to produce these Highlight Reels and then share them to a class folder. My students have access to each others Highlight Reels because it allows them to see different peer models of the same skill, such as use of inflection or eye contact.
Rubric
 
 
Students are also recorded giving feedback to their peers using the Oral Presentation Rubric as a guide. This allows students to better internalize the expectations of the oral presentation for themselves. We spend a significant amount of time focused on the "Presentation Skills" and "Use of Digital Media" domains when giving peer-to-peer feedback.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems

One thing students can always count on in our Socratic seminars is that they will be recorded. Preparing for the Socratic Seminar involves watching film footage of the previous seminar discussion. Students can participate more effectively if we acknowledge what they are doing right, and they buy in more deeply to the idea of using evidence to back their claims when I do the same during this preparation process. In this case, I use evidence in the form of recorded footage to demonstrate their success with some key aspects of a quality academic discussion.For this strategy, the purpose is twofold. First, though I do not re-play each and every single video, I do feel that there is value in capturing student talk that can be made available for those students who can benefit from listening to their peers. This is why I upload and share the videos to all of the students. I have often used recordings of classroom discussion to inform how I will revise the same unit for the following year.The second purpose of this strategy is so that I can script verbatim the exchanges between the students that happen in the seminar. I then provide the students this script, and they can see what we call their “isms”. For example, a student might notice that they say the word “like” or “ya know what I’m sayin’” repeatedly in the seminar. These “isms” affect how people listening to them might respond, and by capturing them on paper, it gives the students evidence of what they will want to work on in terms of the way they orally present themselves. The scripts are also a useful resource for when students are constructing analysis through writing because they or their peers might have cited a strong quote or made a critical connection on which students can build their own analysis.

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Posters in Pairs

One of the most essential steps for a successful Socratic seminar is the preparation of evidence that each student will bring into these discussions. One of the ways we prepare is through Pair Posters followed by a Gallery Walk. To give context, the seminars are whole class and entirely student-facilitated. Given all of the personality dynamics at play during the actual seminar, coupled with the ever-present video camera recording their thoughtful conversation that will later be scripted, it is fundamental that the students ground their opinions and questions in the text in order for the seminar to be a positive learning experience. One method of preparation that helps them do this, and that also generates enthusiasm for this high-stakes discussion, is dividing the class into pairs to create quote posters. After each pair is assigned a literary device, they then use their Annotation Logs to select text evidence shows how the literary device functions. This involves conversation and negotiation between the pair who then have to use the device analysis to connect back to one of the themes we have been studying as a class and incorporate an image that illuminates that connection. The public nature of the gallery walk that ensues after the posters are completed ensures that student pairs also spend time polishing the final product. Their peers will then take pictures of all the posters and decide which ones they might want to use as part of their individual evidence preparation for the Socratic seminar.

 
Whole-Group Instruction
Teacher Tracking of Socratic Seminar

The Socratic Seminar is completely student-run in my class, and I alternate between the inner/outer circle format and a single-circle format. As the teacher, I play the role of videographer and when there is only one circle, I publicly track the quality of student comments on the white board throughout the conversation. This is an effective way to let students know when their thinking is becoming more and more insightful. I use the colors green, orange, and red to color code the tally marks I make on the board. Green means that the student offered a comment that made sense and was explained well. Orange signifies that the students cited evidence with their comment, which is the goal for everyone to reach at least once in the seminar. Lastly, a red tally mark next to a student's name means that the student not only used evidence when they commented but also offered a keen insight using that text evidence. This kind of in-the-moment tracking encourages the students to really think about how to share thoughts in the Seminar that will allow their peers to dig deep into the text and create meaning. They strive for the red tally because it means their brain and their contributions to the Seminar are "on fire".

 
 
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