Like It, Love It, Gotta Have It: Like It, Love It, Gotta Have It

 
 
 
Like It, Love It, Gotta Have It
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Independent Student Learning

Like It, Love It, Gotta Have It

Like It-Love It-Gotta Have It is a strategy I use to differentiate assignments within my micro-groups in a Live Investigation. The three names are, in my opinion, a better way of saying high, medium and low. The kids really love the names. In a Live Investigation, there is usually varying levels of abillity or knowledge in that particular skill. By making a high, medium, and low activity, students have the ability to challenge themselves at their own level. I assign different parts of the room for each activity so I can physically see where the students are. Most of the time, I let the students self-assess and they move throughout the room according to which level they are. They are free to move (up or down) from one section to the next. Most of the activites I assign here are digital. I really like using Khan Academy here, as I can track students physically as well as digitally. With this strategy, I can also target the students at the Like It level and allow the Gotta Have it students to fly a bit on their own. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
This is a time-lapse video of a 20 minute work session where students are doing Like It-Love It-Gotta Have It. The very first second of the video is students getting up from the middle table where they all sat for the lesson. They are about to choose which level of activity they will go to. Notice how many students choose to start at Like It on the far left and move their way to Love It and even Gotta Have It by the end of the video.
Students In Action
 
 
This is a picture of my students right after they self-assessed and grouped themselves. Notice the one boy who chose Gotta Have It at the far left. He ended up asking me a bunch of questions so I had to bump him down to Love It. The majority of the students started at Like It at the far right of the room and moved their way up.
Students In Action
 
 
This is a time-lapse video of a 20 minute work session where students are doing Like It-Love It-Gotta Have It. The very first second of the video is students getting up from the middle table where they all sat for the lesson. They are about to choose which level of activity they will go to. Notice how many students choose to start at Like It on the far left and move their way to Love It and even Gotta Have It by the end of the video.
Students In Action
 
 
This is a picture of my students right after they self-assessed and grouped themselves. Notice the one boy who chose Gotta Have It at the far left. He ended up asking me a bunch of questions so I had to bump him down to Love It. The majority of the students started at Like It at the far right of the room and moved their way up.
Aaron Kaswell
Middle School 88 Peter Rouget
Brooklyn, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grades:
Sixth grade, Seventh grade, Eighth grade
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