Mentor Reading: Mentor Reading

 
 
 
Mentor Reading
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Mentor Reading

Mentor Reading is a researched-based fluency strategy used with readers who lack fluency. In this strategy, my students read aloud to each other. When using partners, my more fluent readers are paired with less fluent readers, which in this case a 3rd grader is paired with kindergartener. My students read a story that they have already read or read a story from their Kinder buddy's book box. When done purposefully and consistently, my students have become very fluent readers and enjoy reading more.

Strategy Resources (5)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This document describes how to pair students in mentor reading, pairing them either by same reading ability or by high level readers with low level readers. Also, lesson plans are provided to help you establish mentor reading in the classroom.
Student Handout
 
 
The Fluency Self Reflection sheet allows students to either rate themselves or rather their peers in terms of their rate, expression, accuracy, and punctuation. It also allows them to identify one specific skill they will continue working on. Have them complete this as a way to close their mentor or buddy reading session.
Student Handout
 
 
This "Mentor Reading Coaching Sheet" offers students different coaching strategies for comprehension and fluency, as well as pre-reading, during reading, and after reading activities. Laminate or place in a sheet protector so that mentor readers can refer to them while reading nonfiction and fiction texts and 'check off' questions they've asked.
Student Handout
 
 
These are leveled comprehension questions to ask during mentor or buddy reading. This is a quick way for peers to check for their classmate's understanding while reading a text together. Students can either choose the leveled 1 questions (more literal, lower level Bloom's) or the leveled 2 questions (higher Bloom's questions).
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
The Fluency Self Reflection sheet allows students to either rate themselves or rather their peers in terms of their rate, expression, accuracy, and punctuation. It also allows them to identify one specific skill they will continue working on. Have them complete this as a way to close their mentor or buddy reading session.
Student Handout
 
 
These are leveled comprehension questions to ask during mentor or buddy reading. This is a quick way for peers to check for their classmate's understanding while reading a text together. Students can either choose the leveled 1 questions (more literal, lower level Bloom's) or the leveled 2 questions (higher Bloom's questions).
Student Handout
 
 
This document describes how to pair students in mentor reading, pairing them either by same reading ability or by high level readers with low level readers. Also, lesson plans are provided to help you establish mentor reading in the classroom.
Student Handout
 
 
This "Mentor Reading Coaching Sheet" offers students different coaching strategies for comprehension and fluency, as well as pre-reading, during reading, and after reading activities. Laminate or place in a sheet protector so that mentor readers can refer to them while reading nonfiction and fiction texts and 'check off' questions they've asked.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Collaborative Student Groups
Color Teams

Color Teams are teams that students form themselves within the rotation groups that I have created. Students usually work in their Color Teams when we conduct a group task. When students are working in their teams, I encourage them to use academic discourse and math vocabulary words. Given that students spend a significant amount of time working independently on digital content in my blended classroom, Color Teams are an important structure to foster productive group work among my students.

 
Instructional Openings
Vocabulary Prediction Chart

In my class, we go over one word a day from the unit we’re learning. The first step is to ask the class how many have heard of the word before. After I tally the number, those students predict its meaning (without giving any contexts). I ask them to justify why they make that prediction (e..g, where have they heard that word before? What clues are they drawing their information from?). After they share their predictions, I then share with them the signal or physical movement attached to word. It then becomes the signal word of the day.

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Problem Solving Investigation

During the Problem Solving Investigation, students are in their teams and are delegating/agreeing on what their next steps and strategies will be during a problem solving investigation. Once they are ready to begin they show the teacher a silent signal, in this case a thumbs-up. They are then dissmissed to begin their investigation using manipulatives and materials they have are given/may select from. During this time each student is given a randomized role based on their drawn number for the session. Then students select strategies to solving the problem and collaborate using the strategies they've selected from our marh strategies card. Once they agree they provide feedback or ask questions in ways to proceed forth/close out the investigation task. The students identify their next steps and are in control of their own learning. I implement this strategy to catalyze stronger teamwork skills and lifelong collaborative abilities.This strategy is developing skill sets students will need in the upper grade levels as well as in college. Basic interpersonal communication and academic language profficiencies can only flourish when ample opportunities are created in the classroom.  

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close