Digital Assessment Tools: digassessmenttools.mp4

 
 
 
0iD2sGjz5cXk.mp4
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Here I explain how and why I use the three digital assessment tools.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Here I explain how and why I use the three digital assessment tools.
 
Assessment & Data

Digital Assessment Tools

I formatively assess students through digital technology like Plickers, Kahoot, and Poll Everywhere. Plickers (Paper clickers) is a free software tool designed like QR codes to collect students’ answers to questions. I create questions on the Plickers website (www.plickers.com) and assign each student a card number. I will read and display the question on the SmartBoard and scan the room to determine students’ answers. The answers are displayed on my device in two colors (incorrect/correct) and in graphical form. This gives me a good visual of where students excel in the curriculum and where they struggle. I also use Kahoot (www.getkahoot.com) as a whole group assessment of students’ understanding. Kahoot allows me to write questions, allows for an allotted amount of time for each question to be answered, and for students to be ranked on time and the correctness of their answer. The students are fully engaged in this activity because it’s over material they’ve all covered, there is music that is aligned with the timer, and they get instant feedback. I also get a report showing their answers to the questions at the end of the game. I use this report, which uses conditional formatting, to show me which answers are correct and which are incorrect. I love how the visual gives me feedback on what students still need to master. I’ve also found Poll Everywhere (polleverywhere.com) to be a great way to formally assess my students. For instance, I asked my students to give me an example of something that is within the hydrosphere. They messaged their answers to our classroom code. It was then displayed on our SmartBoard as a word cloud. I’ve also used Poll Everywhere in conjunction with small group discussion groups with a checklist of skills and standards students need to achieve. For instance, I first used Poll Everywhere to check to see if students understood what objects would be in the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere. I wanted to see if they understood the definitions before we moved onto more complex tasks. The word cloud created a list of all the objects in each sphere. I then had students take words from the word cloud and create drawings showing how the four spheres would interact. The students then shared their drawings via Apple TV and the SmartBoard in small groups. I gave verbal feedback in front of the group as well as asked probing questions if I needed to.

Strategy Resources (4)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Here I explain how and why I use the three digital assessment tools.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Plickers is a formative assessment tool that utilizes an image code linked to a student's name to record the student's answer. This image shows the Plickers teacher display, as well as how students use the cards to share their answers with the teacher.
Student Data
 
 
Poll Everywhere (polleverywhere.com) is a great way to assess prior knowledge and address keywords students associate with a concept. This image shows the pre-assessment prior to students drawing pictures showing the earth sphere connections and presenting them in the Small Group Session. I used the wordle feature of polleverywhere.com to display the words students used to describe the Earth's spheres.
Student Data
 
 
Kahoot is a game-based formative assessment tool that quickly displays a question, records the response time, and records the results on a leaderboard. This image shows the spreadsheet of results the teacher receives after the game is over. All correct answers are in green. All incorrect answers are highlighted in red.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Here I explain how and why I use the three digital assessment tools.
Student Data
 
 
Poll Everywhere (polleverywhere.com) is a great way to assess prior knowledge and address keywords students associate with a concept. This image shows the pre-assessment prior to students drawing pictures showing the earth sphere connections and presenting them in the Small Group Session. I used the wordle feature of polleverywhere.com to display the words students used to describe the Earth's spheres.
Student Data
 
 
Kahoot is a game-based formative assessment tool that quickly displays a question, records the response time, and records the results on a leaderboard. This image shows the spreadsheet of results the teacher receives after the game is over. All correct answers are in green. All incorrect answers are highlighted in red.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Plickers is a formative assessment tool that utilizes an image code linked to a student's name to record the student's answer. This image shows the Plickers teacher display, as well as how students use the cards to share their answers with the teacher.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Modified Flex Model with Gamification

After five years of traditional teaching, I broke away from direct instruction and moved into a self-paced, blended-gamified classroom. My students flexibly move through the curriculum while self-directing and managing their learning. This is done through the use of Classcraft, an online education gaming software, and our classroom game “Isle of Nosredna.” The addition of game elements into my classroom has helped my students stay on track and motivated as they progress through the science curriculum.

Number of Students: ~20 students/period

Number of Adults: one teacher

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 51 minutes

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: Haiku Learning (LMS); Classcraft; Google Classroom; Doctopus (Add-on in Google Sheets connected to Google Classroom); Educreations; Flipboard; Symbaloo; Kidblog; ThingLink; Socrative; Kahoot!

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: iPads (1:1); SMARTboard; Apple TV

Key Features: competency-based; student agency; project-based; gamification; innovative use of space

 
Instructional Openings
Experience Based Lab Introductions

Experience Based Lab Introductions is a strategy I use to get students to start thinking about their prior knowledge and how it can be applied to a problem or challenge. For example, I use the story about Who Polluted the Clark Fork to set the stage for our water filter lab. The story allows students to use their knowledge-base to answer simple questions throughout the story. As the activity continues, I see students' perspectives change as more elements and variables are added to the story. The stories peak students' interest and bring a call to action into a classroom activity. This strategy is embedded in the Conceptual Change Model, where I'm trying to expose students' beliefs, confront and accommodate those beliefs, and then extend the concept to help students move beyond their misconceptions.

 
Academic Culture
Storyline

The storyline of our academic game gives meaning to the students' presence in the game. It enhances the importance of the curriculum and gives students a goal to work toward. The theme our storyline is based around is a deserted island. In the game, students are elite plane crash survivors (PCSs) who must learn to live on the island after not being rescued. Throughout the levels, students are asked to build fire, build shelter, find food, filter water, and survive unexpected storms. By mastering each level, students complete the tasks and move onto the next scenario in the game. 

 
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