Socrative Digital Assessment Tool: Quiz_groundwater.pdf

 
 
 
Quiz_groundwater.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
  • Quiz_groundwater.pdf
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
 
Assessment & Data

Socrative Digital Assessment Tool

Socrative is a Digital Assessment tool I use to conduct formative assessments. For example, during a recent activity I used socrative to assess students' misconceptions or misunderstandings about porosity and permeability when discussing groundwater. The students took the four question quiz and the results were displayed on the board for students and myself to view. From the data I was able to make decisions about my teaching in the next 40 minutes based on the results of the quiz. As a blended learning teacher, I particularly like Socrative as a formative assessment tool because it lets me choose how I my students will be assessed. I can choose to have them do it self-paced, to give instant feedback, or to guide the entire quiz myself. I love the flexibility in this tool and the instant data I receive from it. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
Student Data
 
 
This is a screenshot I took of the data from the groundwater quiz my students took on Socrative. While students were taking the quiz, I was able to see their results pop-up in the Socrative Teacher app. I displayed these results on the board once all students had completed the quiz. When creating the quiz, I purposively removed the option for students to put their name on the quiz. I wanted to make sure to keep their answers anominous in order to address only the patterns and trends in the data. When the data was displayed, I asked my students to determine what they still needed to work on. From the data, I was able to see that questions 3 and 4 were areas my students were still having difficulty with. I was able to use this data to inform my teaching as we went into the lab to complete our Who Polluted the Clark Fork activity and building of water filters.
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
Student Data
 
 
This is a screenshot I took of the data from the groundwater quiz my students took on Socrative. While students were taking the quiz, I was able to see their results pop-up in the Socrative Teacher app. I displayed these results on the board once all students had completed the quiz. When creating the quiz, I purposively removed the option for students to put their name on the quiz. I wanted to make sure to keep their answers anominous in order to address only the patterns and trends in the data. When the data was displayed, I asked my students to determine what they still needed to work on. From the data, I was able to see that questions 3 and 4 were areas my students were still having difficulty with. I was able to use this data to inform my teaching as we went into the lab to complete our Who Polluted the Clark Fork activity and building of water filters.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Time and Space
Music Time Indicator

Music is used to transition students at the beginning and end of the class period. Students spend the first four minutes of class logging into their learning management system Haiku and Classcraft account (gamification platform). We have established as a class that all iPads (we are 1:1) should be charged and open during this period of time. This length of time is indicated by a 4:34 minute clip of music. During this time, I take attendance, fill out advanced make-ups, and talk to students who have been absent or have questions.The last three minutes in our class are indicated by transition music. This music lasts 2 minutes. It indicates that students can log out of Haiku, close their apps and their iPads. If students are in the middle of an activity, they wrap-up what they are working on either by saving it as a draft or submitting their assignment. If students close their iPads before the music sounds and have stopped working, they are deducted health points (HP) on Classcraft. I do this because I want students to use every minute for learning as I would if I was using direct instruction in my class.

 
Feedback Systems
Instant Feedback

Instant Feedback, my method for conferencing with students on a daily basis, is one of the strategies I use each day to help my students progress through the content in my largely self-paced course. I also use Instant Feedback to gauge my students' understanding of the material we are covering. As I walk around the room, I'm constantly looking at what students have written and am asking them to explain their thinking. If I need to learn more about their thinking, I ask additional questions until I identify the source of their confusion or misconceptions or until I am convinced that they are on the right track. This year I have begun to experiment with a protocol called "SE2R" (Summarize, Explain, Redirect, Resubmit) to structure some of my Instant Feedback to my students and to help them identify their next steps.

 
Learning Apps
ThingLink for PBL in Science

ThingLink is an online software used to make images interactive. This year, I've used it during a project/problem-based learning (PBL) activity, in which students did a series of tasks to collect data on a soil site of their choice (please see my "Model Overview" to learn about how I use Levels in my classroom). They collected this data and saved it for the final activity, the Soil Report, which asked the students to compile all the information they learned about their soil site and to post it on a ThingLink. This ThingLink was then used to make a target on the larger map of Paracini Ponds (the field site we visited), which was also its own ThingLink. The insight I was looking to gain from the completion of this activity was whether students could take scientific data from a field exercise, analyze it, and make a decision about how the land should be used. 

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close