Pick-A-Lesson: PickALesson.mp4

 
 
 
PickALesson.mp4
Strategy Explanation
 
 
In this video I explain why there is a clear need for a lesson organizer in the type of self-paced classroom I run.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
In this video I explain why there is a clear need for a lesson organizer in the type of self-paced classroom I run.
 
Time and Space

Pick-A-Lesson

In a self-paced class, students need to have access to any lesson, at any time. Thus, I created an area at the back of my classroom where every lesson is printed out and organized sequentially for students to take whenever they are ready to move to the next lesson. This allows students to continually work at their own pace. It also changes the dynamic of the learning process - students are no longer passively given assignments by the teacher and are now actively choosing which assignments they want to do.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
In this video I explain why there is a clear need for a lesson organizer in the type of self-paced classroom I run.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
All the lessons in the course are printed out and put into this organizer. The lesson packets are always available to students; they can pick up whatever lesson they need during class or to take home. I always have to use some of my prep time to make sure there is enough of each lesson printed for students.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
In this video I explain why there is a clear need for a lesson organizer in the type of self-paced classroom I run.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
All the lessons in the course are printed out and put into this organizer. The lesson packets are always available to students; they can pick up whatever lesson they need during class or to take home. I always have to use some of my prep time to make sure there is enough of each lesson printed for students.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Candy Land Path

The Candy Land Path is a Candy Land-style trail that runs across several walls in my classroom. Each tile on the trail represents a lesson my students have to master in order to advance in the course. This strategy allows my students' progress to be seen and followed on a day-to-day basis, ultimately giving transparency to the learning process. This is a powerful visual tool for every student - especially for over- and under-achievers - and allows me to reframe school as a learning journey and progression as opposed to just working for a grade. The Path also brings an element of fun to the classroom while preserving its motivational purpose. 

 
Routines and Procedures
Student Binders

We don't use text books in our class, we make them. Each student is given a binder at the beginning of the year. The binder becomes a reference book for the students as they fill it up with the lessons they have completed. Many standard textbooks have become a diluted hodepdoge of information, hard for most students (and even myself) to decipher. This binder allows me to create a resource tailored to my students.

 
Academic Culture
Station Expectations

Students in my self-paced blended classroom work in groups every day to complete a series of activities we call "Learning Stations." Learning Stations provide multiple ways in which my students can demonstrate mastery and build a digital portfolio of content to draw on throughout the year. By creating groups in which my students are paired up according to their supported reading and lexile levels, I foster a collaborative culture in which students don't feel singled out and high quality products can be produced by all groups. To alleviate the stress that sometimes accompanies engagement with highly targeted, rigorous activities, I allow my students to choose Station activities that most appropriately address the Learning Targets (please see the "Learning Targets" strategy video) they might struggle with or want to improve in. Reinforcing Station Expectations with explicit instructions at the beginning of each class is a strategy that ensures that my students understand what is expected of them during the period.

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close