Math Notebook Support on Computers: Blended learning Tchart.jpg

 
 
 
Blended learning Tchart.jpg
Poster
 
 
This poster is created when we begin blended learning to establish expectations using a T-chart. The left side has what someone would see if they peeked through the window during this time, and what they should hear upon walking around the room. I prompt students to visualize what they want these transitions to sound like and look like. Once these expectations are understood following the creation of the T-Chart, a student videotapes the students transitioning, and the other group observes the team transitioning. Half the class observes, the other half practices, and then they switch. We go through this process daily until students feel they are ready, always referring back to the poster as a guide and adjusting if needed.
  • Blended learning Tchart.jpg
Poster
 
 
This poster is created when we begin blended learning to establish expectations using a T-chart. The left side has what someone would see if they peeked through the window during this time, and what they should hear upon walking around the room. I prompt students to visualize what they want these transitions to sound like and look like. Once these expectations are understood following the creation of the T-Chart, a student videotapes the students transitioning, and the other group observes the team transitioning. Half the class observes, the other half practices, and then they switch. We go through this process daily until students feel they are ready, always referring back to the poster as a guide and adjusting if needed.
 
Independent Student Learning

Math Notebook Support on Computers

Each of my students is given the option to use different notepads, lined or grid paper, and scratch paper we have. This strategy is implemented to develop students' ability to convey understanding using models or ideas that they have when using our math software. Students in this clip are given ideas about how to express their thinking using our math strategies card along the computer. Students use the notepads or paper to refer back to their previous notes, and to also help one another by referring back to notes where applicable.  

Strategy Resources (2)
Poster
 
 
This poster is created when we begin blended learning to establish expectations using a T-chart. The left side has what someone would see if they peeked through the window during this time, and what they should hear upon walking around the room. I prompt students to visualize what they want these transitions to sound like and look like. Once these expectations are understood following the creation of the T-Chart, a student videotapes the students transitioning, and the other group observes the team transitioning. Half the class observes, the other half practices, and then they switch. We go through this process daily until students feel they are ready, always referring back to the poster as a guide and adjusting if needed.
 
Poster
 
 
This poster is created when we begin blended learning to establish expectations using a T-chart. The left side has what someone would see if they peeked through the window during this time, and what they should hear upon walking around the room. I prompt students to visualize what they want these transitions to sound like and look like. Once these expectations are understood following the creation of the T-Chart, a student videotapes the students transitioning, and the other group observes the team transitioning. Half the class observes, the other half practices, and then they switch. We go through this process daily until students feel they are ready, always referring back to the poster as a guide and adjusting if needed.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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