Small Group Intervention: Small Group Intervention

 
 
 
Small Group Intervention
Teacher In Action
 
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Small-Group Instruction

Small Group Intervention

This strategy is a small group guided instruction, or in student friendly language, team time with Mr. Esparza. A group of 3-4 students is pulled as other teams are conducting a differentiated math investigation. Students are given a selection of materials to create models and formulate ideas. We work as a collective to identify our misconceptions by asking ourselves questions, explaining why, and checking for understanding. As a scaffold, students use hand signals and our learning goal success rubrics to check themselves for understanding throughout the process.

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
When my students learn about fractions in 2nd and 3rd grade, we create these fraction grids to conceptualize the numerator and denominator of fractions. Each student in my class creates one and keeps it inside a sandwich bag inside their desks. Students may refer back to it at any time.
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
The fraction strip is a hands-on manipulative that students use to create models of different fractions by folding and then cutting rectangular strips into varying equivalent sized folds to investigate what fraction they can create. The strips are printed on different color paper so students can create and order various sized fractions from smallest to largest or vice versa.
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
When my students learn about fractions in 2nd and 3rd grade, we create these fraction grids to conceptualize the numerator and denominator of fractions. Each student in my class creates one and keeps it inside a sandwich bag inside their desks. Students may refer back to it at any time.
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
The fraction strip is a hands-on manipulative that students use to create models of different fractions by folding and then cutting rectangular strips into varying equivalent sized folds to investigate what fraction they can create. The strips are printed on different color paper so students can create and order various sized fractions from smallest to largest or vice versa.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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Instructional Openings
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Routines and Procedures
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Routines and Procedures
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