Details Vs. Main Idea Graphic Organizer: Main Ideas & Details.docx

 
 
 
Main Ideas & Details.docx
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
  • Main Ideas & Details.docx
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
 
Small-Group Instruction

Details Vs. Main Idea Graphic Organizer

Graphic organizers of all sorts are used in every classroom. Guided Reading should be no exception. This strategy is not meant to focus on one type of graphic organizer, but rather on how a graphic organizer can be used to support students in accessing the text to make meaningful connections and form meaningful conversations about the text. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
Raul Gonzalez
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
First grade
Similar Strategies
Whole-Group Instruction
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Assessment & Data
Flash Fluency

Flash Fluency is a strategy I use during guided reading sessions to make immediate adjustments to my instruction, based on my students' needs. To gather the information I need, I give a reading fluency check to one student from the group using a current or cold read text. The student reads for one minute while I keep track of miscues and make observations. It is followed by a quick comprehension check. Once this is completed, I address the student's needs immediately with the entire small group. Since my reading groups are homogenous, one student's needs are generally reflective of the needs of the other students in the group. 

 
Instructional Openings
Front Loading

Front Loading gives my students an opportunity to preview skills or information in advance of it being taught to them. I used to only do Front Loading in the opening of my lessons, but now we have blended learning programs that allow my students to front-load information whenever they start reading. Some examples of Front Loading using online programs are iReady, which has additional lesson assignment capability, and MyOn, which allows my students to preview text about upcoming topics.

 
 
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