Numbered Heads: Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf

 
 
 
Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf
Presentation
 
 
This is an example of how students know what they are responsible for after they draw a number from a cup of ping pong balls with numbers written on them. Students know their roles and are able to give feedback at the conclusion of lessons based on their role expectations.
  • Numbered heads & Team Role Math Lesson Sample.pdf
Presentation
 
 
This is an example of how students know what they are responsible for after they draw a number from a cup of ping pong balls with numbers written on them. Students know their roles and are able to give feedback at the conclusion of lessons based on their role expectations.
 
Routines and Procedures

Numbered Heads

Numbered heads is a practice we use to randomize and create an element of excitement at the beginning of lessons/investigations. Each student draws a random number from their team cups to start lessons once a week.

Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
Presentation
 
 
This is an example of how students know what they are responsible for after they draw a number from a cup of ping pong balls with numbers written on them. Students know their roles and are able to give feedback at the conclusion of lessons based on their role expectations.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
I will post this up each lesson to designate and randomize what number of each team is responsible for certain parts of the lesson as seen in this example. This is great because students need to experience various feedback situations, and they can coach each other about how to give specific feedback since it is a team task.
Students In Action
 
 
Presentation
 
 
This is an example of how students know what they are responsible for after they draw a number from a cup of ping pong balls with numbers written on them. Students know their roles and are able to give feedback at the conclusion of lessons based on their role expectations.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
I will post this up each lesson to designate and randomize what number of each team is responsible for certain parts of the lesson as seen in this example. This is great because students need to experience various feedback situations, and they can coach each other about how to give specific feedback since it is a team task.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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