Start, Result, Change: StudentsusingSRC.jpg

 
 
 
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Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
  • StudentsusingSRC.jpg
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Start, Result, Change

Start, Result, Change is a strategy students use during math investigations to help them process what is hapenning in word problems. Using the parts or information students identify as being present, this strategy is a scaffold which enables students to process and consider what our next steps to solving a problem will be. Do we need to find the start, change, or the result?  

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Whole-Group Instruction
Main Idea Think Pair Share

Many teachers--myself included--utilize a version of the Think Pair Share strategy to give students opportunities for social learning and to build a culture of classroom community that includes respectful academic discourse. I use the Main Idea Think Pair Share strategy to ensure that my students are able to identify and articulate the main ideas of texts we are reading, which is one of the most foundational literacy skills that all effective readers must develop. I find that it can be helpful to use scaffolds like sentence stems and a variety of starting approaches (e.g., "the student with the longest hair speaks first") to ensure that this strategy remains fresh and accessible to my students, many of whom are English Language Learners.

 
Routines and Procedures
Blended Learning Self-Monitoring

Students self monitoring- At the closing of each session students turns and talk to their neighbor about how their session went, what went well, and what a challenge was. This is done so students have support for their sessions, and so the teacher can visually evaluate how the students feel they are doing. The self monitoring also helps students consider what their next steps should be, as well as offer up suggestions on who to ask for help with certain lessons or who the 'ask an expert' go to would be. 


 
Routines and Procedures
Transition Time

Within my blended learning classroom, students transition between computers and their desks or the carpet at least twice during every class period. To ensure that we don't lose valuable time during these transitions, I have implemented a structured process to support my students in moving from one station to another. When it's time for transition, I call out the name of a station, and the students in the appropriate group call out their group's name, indicating to me that they know where they are going. As students rotate onto the computers, they know that they should walk counter-clockwise, starting from the scratch paper area to their work areas. 

 
 
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