Start, Result, Change: StudentsusingSRC.jpg

 
 
 
20150130_121223.jpg
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
  • StudentsusingSRC.jpg
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Start, Result, Change

Start, Result, Change is a strategy students use during math investigations to help them process what is hapenning in word problems. Using the parts or information students identify as being present, this strategy is a scaffold which enables students to process and consider what our next steps to solving a problem will be. Do we need to find the start, change, or the result?  

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Instructional Openings
Know, Want to Know, Solve

KWS stands for what we Know, Want to know, and how might we Solve a word problem. The KWS Chart is a catalyst that gets my students to organize and analyze complex word problems. My students are more successful with word problems when they have a toolkit for simplifying the complex information often found within word problems. This tool is an essential scaffold for English Language Learners in my class. The strategy is also great to uncover with my students the fact that there are multiple ways of solving a problem, no matter how complex it may be, and often times there may be multiple routes to a solution.  

 
Small-Group Instruction
Small Group Intervention

This strategy is a small group guided instruction, or in student friendly language, team time with Mr. Esparza. A group of 3-4 students is pulled as other teams are conducting a differentiated math investigation. Students are given a selection of materials to create models and formulate ideas. We work as a collective to identify our misconceptions by asking ourselves questions, explaining why, and checking for understanding. As a scaffold, students use hand signals and our learning goal success rubrics to check themselves for understanding throughout the process.

 
Feedback Systems
Peer Feedback

There are two feedback practices within this strategy video. The first half shows us setting up the expectations and granting randomly assigned roles for the feedback session. Prior to dismissing I try to have students point where they are going to clear up any confusion. The second half shows students using our teamwork rubric sentence stems to write down comments. Students know they are going to use different color markers to write on team posters and give a glow and or a grow for the other team. 

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close