Start, Result, Change: StudentsusingSRC.jpg

 
 
 
20150130_121223.jpg
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
  • StudentsusingSRC.jpg
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
 
Collaborative Student Groups

Start, Result, Change

Start, Result, Change is a strategy students use during math investigations to help them process what is hapenning in word problems. Using the parts or information students identify as being present, this strategy is a scaffold which enables students to process and consider what our next steps to solving a problem will be. Do we need to find the start, change, or the result?  

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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Collaborative Student Groups
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Whole-Group Instruction
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Routines and Procedures
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