Whole Group Discussion: Turn up the Volume (1).png

 
 
 
Turn up the Volume (1).png
Presentation
 
 
This a slide from our Town Hall meeting that my colleagues and I do at the beginning of the year. We use the Town Hall to set expectations in all areas, and we do a lot with hand signals. Students will use this during whole group discussion to ask the speaker to turn up the volume without calling out.
  • Turn up the Volume (1).png
Presentation
 
 
This a slide from our Town Hall meeting that my colleagues and I do at the beginning of the year. We use the Town Hall to set expectations in all areas, and we do a lot with hand signals. Students will use this during whole group discussion to ask the speaker to turn up the volume without calling out.
 
Whole-Group Instruction

Whole Group Discussion

During Live Investigation and Task sessions (both teacher-led), I often use a whole group discussion format just like a traditional classroom. Blended or not, there is no substitute for discussion.

Strategy Resources (2)
 
Presentation
 
 
This a slide from our Town Hall meeting that my colleagues and I do at the beginning of the year. We use the Town Hall to set expectations in all areas, and we do a lot with hand signals. Students will use this during whole group discussion to ask the speaker to turn up the volume without calling out.
 
Presentation
 
 
This a slide from our Town Hall meeting that my colleagues and I do at the beginning of the year. We use the Town Hall to set expectations in all areas, and we do a lot with hand signals. Students will use this during whole group discussion to ask the speaker to turn up the volume without calling out.
Aaron Kaswell
Middle School 88 Peter Rouget
Brooklyn, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grades:
Sixth grade, Seventh grade, Eighth grade
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