Whole-Group Instruction

Rapid Fire

Sometimes the only thing holding students back is practice time. It's amazing how much they can get done when they get themselves into a work frenzy. During Rapid Fire, we create a "controlled crazy" by playing techno music while students work in pairs to solve as many computation problems as possible in five minutes. This is a great strategy to use before taking the lesson to word problems, and provides a break from sitting quietly and attentively during the lesson. There is also always an element of choice in what the students want to focus on, helping them to adjust their self-evaluation for later on.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Rapid Fire is a perfect way to get in as much practice as possible. Playing techno music and watching the kids move with urgency is awesome. Having them reflect on errors they made in the math rush afterwards is the icing on the cake.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Rapid Fire is a perfect way to get in as much practice as possible. Playing techno music and watching the kids move with urgency is awesome. Having them reflect on errors they made in the math rush afterwards is the icing on the cake.
Daniel Utset-Guerrero
Holmes Elementary School
Miami, FL


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
Similar Strategies
Whole-Group Instruction
Whole Group Exploration

Whole Group Exploration is a form of whole group instruction where we work with conceptual models to understand the algorithm behind solving math problems. Students work with whiteboards at the carpet as we discuss and work through a series of problems that build and understanding of our skill. As students successfully prove that they are ready to work independently, I dismiss them to their seat with our practice, keeping the students who need additional support to go through more practice problems. This strategy allows me to give more support to students who need it and release students who are ready to excel.


 
Assessment & Data
Marzano's Practice

At the end of the lesson, when it comes time to practice, my students find themselves at varying levels of success with the material. Some of my students have mastered material, while others need more guidance. I teach my students how to use Robert Marzano's scale of self-assessment, which allows them to rate their level of need. In our class, each level of the scale corresponds to a mode of practice, including teacher guidance, peer tutoring, online practice, and enrichment. 

 
Instructional Planning
Digital Content Connection

Digital Content Connection ensures that students, while engaged in online practice, work on targeted skills that will help them achieve their individual goals. Through various forms of data (Exit Tickets, formative/summative assessments, online learning programs, etc.), I identify the skills that each student needs to practice. I will often group my students into homogenous levels and assign them the same practice. Other times I assign my students individual lessons to meet their needs. Through this process, my students receive practice that is tailored to their needs, allowing them to master a skill before moving on to the next level of content.

 
 
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