Jeff's Mindsets

A blended teacher’s personal mindsets shape his decisions as an educator. These mindsets influence general pedagogies, instructional approaches, and short-term decision making, alike. Check out how Jeff’s mindsets have helped to shape his blended instruction.

Strategy Resources (1)
Teacher Reflection
Teacher Reflection
Jeff Astor
Cindy and Bill Simon Technology Academy High School
Los Angeles, CA


About this strategy

Prep Time:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Rotation Enables Small Group Lessons

At Aspire Titan Academy, we use a rotational model where some students engage with interactive software, enabling small group lessons for others. Our students have 90 to 120 minutes of individual computer time daily. Our rotational model is currently evolving to use more programs and create more rotations. The goal is to increase the opportunities for small group instruction where we can better meet individual needs.

Number of Students: 26 students

Number of Adults: one teacher; various other adults support during specific times (e.g., Blended Learning Coordinator, Special Education Teachers, etc.)

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 60 minutes--two 30  minute rotations (Math Block)

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: DreamBox

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: Lenovo ThinkPads (1:2 ratio); SMARTboard; Document Camera; iPad (for teacher)

Key Features: station rotation; student agency

Assessment & Data
Using Multiple Sources of Data to Inform ELA Instruction & Grouping

As a blended school, sometimes there is an overwhelming amount of data. Knowing how to use it and when is critical in making sure that the data is both purposeful and useful. Included is both offline (DRA, RAZ, and Interim Benchmark assessments) and online (iReady) assessments to inform instruction and make groups (guided reading, computer groups, and skills-based groups).

Routines and Procedures
Heads Together

In the Heads Together strategy, my students huddle in pre-determined teams at the beginning or end of a lesson to discuss a question, give each other advice, or decide on a response collaboratively. I use this quick strategy to give my students consistent opportunities to engage in productive group work throughout each class period.

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