Independent Student Learning

"Look At Your Notes"

The most common answer I give students when they ask me a question is "look at your notes." The course is designed so any question in the practice problems or mastery quiz have been directly addressed on the current video lesson or a past one. Because the design of the lessons has been created with this intentionality, it's easy to refer students to the exact place in the notes they can find their answer. It's been a challenge to not jump in and immediately offer students help, and many get frustrated in the moment, but over the course of the year students develop strong independence in their learning, able to use their notes, peers, and online resources to find the answer they were looking for.


Strategy Resources (3)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
Student Handout
 
 
The mastery quizzes correspond closely to notes and practice. It's a fair system, and if students fail a mastery quiz it is usually because they hadn't looked over their notes closely rather than some deep conceptual misunderstanding. As the year progresses, they begin to realize the correlation and see the value in studying their notes.
Student Handout
 
 
Lesson packet that includes lesson notes and independent practice. If you look, there is a strong correspondence between the notes and the practice problems. If a student is having a problem, I can usually just refer them to a problem from the notes rather than reexplain the concept. As the year progresses, students begin to start looking at the notes closer before asking a question.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
It may seem simple but it is the most important strategy I use with my students that contributes to their ownership over their own learning.
Student Handout
 
 
The mastery quizzes correspond closely to notes and practice. It's a fair system, and if students fail a mastery quiz it is usually because they hadn't looked over their notes closely rather than some deep conceptual misunderstanding. As the year progresses, they begin to realize the correlation and see the value in studying their notes.
Student Handout
 
 
Lesson packet that includes lesson notes and independent practice. If you look, there is a strong correspondence between the notes and the practice problems. If a student is having a problem, I can usually just refer them to a problem from the notes rather than reexplain the concept. As the year progresses, students begin to start looking at the notes closer before asking a question.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Progress Check-Ins

I have weekly check-in's with students about how they are progressing through the lessons. This ensure face-to-face time with each student and allows me to hold them accountable to the goals they are setting. I ask a standard set of questions "What lesson are you on today?", "What lesson do you plan on being on in a week" ,"Is there anything you need to help you reach your goal?" I record all their answers and keep a running log so I can refer back to these notes each time I conference with a student.

 
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Alternative Mastery Program

Many of our students come to us far below grade level, some still struggling with adding and multiplying. To support these students, my co-teacher Mr. Elizondo developed an alternative program for students not prepared for high school level standards. While we want every student to work their way through the high school geometry curriculum at their own pace, we felt that our class would become prohibitive and demoralizing for students with low skills or severe learning disabilities. In the alternative program, my students work at their own pace through a series of worksheets that meet the same standards as you would see in a high school geometry curriculum except the difficulty has been adjusted to make it attainable for students in the program. The Alternative Mastery Program is a step towards greater personalization of the curriculum to meet all of my students' needs.

 
Assessment & Data
Pop The Bubble

The flipped mastery model gives students loads of time to work independently, so every few weeks we like to bring the class together to play a game. Pop The Bubble, which my coteacher Mr. Elizondo came up with, is hands down the students' favorite. Each team of students gets 5 bubbles, and when they get a question right, they can pop another teams' bubble. The last team with bubbles remaining wins the game. It's a great twist on the traditional Kahoots quiz game.


 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close