Academic Culture

Stamina Captains

Stamina captains track stamina among students at their table throughout independent work. Especially while working on differentiated or individualized practice, students may feel "alone" in their work and thus easily get distracted (whereas they might feel more pressure if all students are working on the same exact practice). Thus, through emphasizing the skill of stamina, students constantly think about their level of focus and ability to avoid distractions. When students begin discussing something that is off-topic, the stamina captain will write down their name on a post-it. After that, those students get a chance to "fix" their behavior by getting back on task. If their stamina is not fixed, they then get a phone call home as a consequence for their lack of focus. Through this closed loop, parents and students understand their focus and work at school.

Strategy Resources (4)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a Google Form that follows an independent practice session. Students evaluate themselves on their persistence and get a chance to reflect on their work.
Poster
 
 
This poster states the expectations I have for students showing stamina and persistence. Zone 1 means whisper voices.
Poster
 
 
This picture highlights expectations that we are currently focusing on, including stamina. At the beginning of each week, and when needed, we refer to this chart, reminding students of the expectations we have of them.
Poster
 
 
These post-its are generated by "Stamina Captains", who record the stamina (and lack therof) they see in other students.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a Google Form that follows an independent practice session. Students evaluate themselves on their persistence and get a chance to reflect on their work.
Poster
 
 
This picture highlights expectations that we are currently focusing on, including stamina. At the beginning of each week, and when needed, we refer to this chart, reminding students of the expectations we have of them.
Poster
 
 
These post-its are generated by "Stamina Captains", who record the stamina (and lack therof) they see in other students.
Poster
 
 
This poster states the expectations I have for students showing stamina and persistence. Zone 1 means whisper voices.
Stephen Pham
Rocketship Si Se Puede Academy
San Jose, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
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