Collaborative Student Groups

Mentor Reading

Mentor Reading is a researched-based fluency strategy used with readers who lack fluency. In this strategy, my students read aloud to each other. When using partners, my more fluent readers are paired with less fluent readers, which in this case a 3rd grader is paired with kindergartener. My students read a story that they have already read or read a story from their Kinder buddy's book box. When done purposefully and consistently, my students have become very fluent readers and enjoy reading more.

Strategy Resources (5)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This document describes how to pair students in mentor reading, pairing them either by same reading ability or by high level readers with low level readers. Also, lesson plans are provided to help you establish mentor reading in the classroom.
Student Handout
 
 
The Fluency Self Reflection sheet allows students to either rate themselves or rather their peers in terms of their rate, expression, accuracy, and punctuation. It also allows them to identify one specific skill they will continue working on. Have them complete this as a way to close their mentor or buddy reading session.
Student Handout
 
 
This "Mentor Reading Coaching Sheet" offers students different coaching strategies for comprehension and fluency, as well as pre-reading, during reading, and after reading activities. Laminate or place in a sheet protector so that mentor readers can refer to them while reading nonfiction and fiction texts and 'check off' questions they've asked.
Student Handout
 
 
These are leveled comprehension questions to ask during mentor or buddy reading. This is a quick way for peers to check for their classmate's understanding while reading a text together. Students can either choose the leveled 1 questions (more literal, lower level Bloom's) or the leveled 2 questions (higher Bloom's questions).
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
The Fluency Self Reflection sheet allows students to either rate themselves or rather their peers in terms of their rate, expression, accuracy, and punctuation. It also allows them to identify one specific skill they will continue working on. Have them complete this as a way to close their mentor or buddy reading session.
Student Handout
 
 
These are leveled comprehension questions to ask during mentor or buddy reading. This is a quick way for peers to check for their classmate's understanding while reading a text together. Students can either choose the leveled 1 questions (more literal, lower level Bloom's) or the leveled 2 questions (higher Bloom's questions).
Student Handout
 
 
This document describes how to pair students in mentor reading, pairing them either by same reading ability or by high level readers with low level readers. Also, lesson plans are provided to help you establish mentor reading in the classroom.
Student Handout
 
 
This "Mentor Reading Coaching Sheet" offers students different coaching strategies for comprehension and fluency, as well as pre-reading, during reading, and after reading activities. Laminate or place in a sheet protector so that mentor readers can refer to them while reading nonfiction and fiction texts and 'check off' questions they've asked.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
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