Assessment & Data

Socrative Digital Assessment Tool

Socrative is a Digital Assessment tool I use to conduct formative assessments. For example, during a recent activity I used socrative to assess students' misconceptions or misunderstandings about porosity and permeability when discussing groundwater. The students took the four question quiz and the results were displayed on the board for students and myself to view. From the data I was able to make decisions about my teaching in the next 40 minutes based on the results of the quiz. As a blended learning teacher, I particularly like Socrative as a formative assessment tool because it lets me choose how I my students will be assessed. I can choose to have them do it self-paced, to give instant feedback, or to guide the entire quiz myself. I love the flexibility in this tool and the instant data I receive from it. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
Student Data
 
 
This is a screenshot I took of the data from the groundwater quiz my students took on Socrative. While students were taking the quiz, I was able to see their results pop-up in the Socrative Teacher app. I displayed these results on the board once all students had completed the quiz. When creating the quiz, I purposively removed the option for students to put their name on the quiz. I wanted to make sure to keep their answers anominous in order to address only the patterns and trends in the data. When the data was displayed, I asked my students to determine what they still needed to work on. From the data, I was able to see that questions 3 and 4 were areas my students were still having difficulty with. I was able to use this data to inform my teaching as we went into the lab to complete our Who Polluted the Clark Fork activity and building of water filters.
Student Handout
 
 
This is a quiz I created on Socrative. This quiz was done self-paced by the students using the Student Socrative app. As the students completed the quiz, I could see their results on the Teacher Socrative app. I used Apple TV to display their results on my SmartBoard and to address their misconceptions. Another awesome thing is that if you don't have 1:1 devices, you can create quizzes on Socrative, download them, and print them like the link to the quiz I provided.
Student Data
 
 
This is a screenshot I took of the data from the groundwater quiz my students took on Socrative. While students were taking the quiz, I was able to see their results pop-up in the Socrative Teacher app. I displayed these results on the board once all students had completed the quiz. When creating the quiz, I purposively removed the option for students to put their name on the quiz. I wanted to make sure to keep their answers anominous in order to address only the patterns and trends in the data. When the data was displayed, I asked my students to determine what they still needed to work on. From the data, I was able to see that questions 3 and 4 were areas my students were still having difficulty with. I was able to use this data to inform my teaching as we went into the lab to complete our Who Polluted the Clark Fork activity and building of water filters.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
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Instant Feedback

Instant Feedback, my method for conferencing with students on a daily basis, is one of the strategies I use each day to help my students progress through the content in my largely self-paced course. I also use Instant Feedback to gauge my students' understanding of the material we are covering. As I walk around the room, I'm constantly looking at what students have written and am asking them to explain their thinking. If I need to learn more about their thinking, I ask additional questions until I identify the source of their confusion or misconceptions or until I am convinced that they are on the right track. This year I have begun to experiment with a protocol called "SE2R" (Summarize, Explain, Redirect, Resubmit) to structure some of my Instant Feedback to my students and to help them identify their next steps.

 
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Planning is an essential part of a blended teacher’s practice. In blended environments, where students can be at different points in a course on various modalities, blended teachers need to be very intentional about how they plan. Check out the video below to see how Jessi plans for instruction in her blended classroom.


 
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Doctopus is a widget you can use in Google to distribute documents. I use Doctopus because it's the only tool that I know of that will allow me to distribute a copy of a document to each student in view only mode (Google Classroom at this point only allows for edit only mode). I use Doctopus to distribute the Quest Contracts to students so that each student has access to the document (please see my "Model Overview" to learn about Quest Contracts). I have viewing and editing privileges, whereas each student only has viewing privileges. This widget allows me to update my students' Quest Contracts on my iPad after they have mastered an activity. The student can then go into the same document and view what they have completed and what they still need to complete. Doctopus also works with Google Classroom to allow me to important Google Classroom rosters. 

 
 
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