Routines and Procedures

Station Transition

Station transitions occur multiple times in a blended classroom. During station transitions, the team or group that’s coming out of the computers lines up and collects the materials ready to go into the whole group lesson on the rug. At the same time, the group that was just on the rug is now going to the computers and collecting their materials for the computers. We give each students 30 seconds to transition, after which we positively praise 3-4 students for making good transitions.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Poster
 
 
The Blended Learning Criteria for Success is a chart that displays for students the steps and behaviors they need order to demonstrate what a successful blended learning session looks and sounds like, paying attention to behavior, noise level, materials, and effort. These colorful charts are displayed in kid-friendly language, are printed in color and laminated, then tape them in front of each computer so that students can refer to them and be reminded of the blended learning behavioral expectations.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Poster
 
 
The Blended Learning Criteria for Success is a chart that displays for students the steps and behaviors they need order to demonstrate what a successful blended learning session looks and sounds like, paying attention to behavior, noise level, materials, and effort. These colorful charts are displayed in kid-friendly language, are printed in color and laminated, then tape them in front of each computer so that students can refer to them and be reminded of the blended learning behavioral expectations.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Routines and Procedures
Music Pair Share

This strategy helps to lighten the mood and get everyone moving. Students in a blended learning class at the elementary level need time to take a break from blended learning at various moments and engage with each other.This strategy facilitates the opportunity to lower the affective filter and have students engage in academic and non-academic conversations. We review the expectations for the transition and what their next steps are when they find a partner. Students spontaneously select a partner, put their hands up together in the air, and keep them there once everyone has a partner. we then decide by height and shirt color who will share first. Any students remaining are paired up accordingly. The song playing serves as a signal about when to go and when to stop moving.  

 
Whole-Group Instruction
Mystery Problem

This strategy is a biweekly problem solving investigation on recently learned content. Typically students will be given sample scanned answers that I have hand selected. These problems have been previously solved. Students meet on the carpet for the mystery problem reveal. We also cover what the goal of our session will be using a checklist/success rubric. They are then dismissed to investigate in teams. The students select manipulatives to discuss, develop an agreed upon idea, and critique which student(s) response they agree with/why. If a team finishes early they can work on they "Step ahead" which is harder differentiated task. Finally they use the checklist to self reflect if they were successful during the mystery problem session.

 
Whole-Group Instruction
Main Idea Think Pair Share

Many teachers--myself included--utilize a version of the Think Pair Share strategy to give students opportunities for social learning and to build a culture of classroom community that includes respectful academic discourse. I use the Main Idea Think Pair Share strategy to ensure that my students are able to identify and articulate the main ideas of texts we are reading, which is one of the most foundational literacy skills that all effective readers must develop. I find that it can be helpful to use scaffolds like sentence stems and a variety of starting approaches (e.g., "the student with the longest hair speaks first") to ensure that this strategy remains fresh and accessible to my students, many of whom are English Language Learners.

 
 
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