Small-Group Instruction

Details Vs. Main Idea Graphic Organizer

Graphic organizers of all sorts are used in every classroom. Guided Reading should be no exception. This strategy is not meant to focus on one type of graphic organizer, but rather on how a graphic organizer can be used to support students in accessing the text to make meaningful connections and form meaningful conversations about the text. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is an example of a basic graphic organizer that students use to organize details/main ideas while/after reading. Other basic graphic organizers for readers include T-charts, bubble maps, flow charts, etc.
Raul Gonzalez
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
First grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Shared Inquiry Trackers

This is an excel document that is projected during shared inquiry. Each time that a student shares a comment, question, or any other type of substantial response in the group's conversation, a cell is filled to create a bar graph that is easily identifiable by students. It informs them and myself about the participation levels and motivates students to give more to a conversation. 

 
Assessment & Data
Flash Fluency Glows and Grows

Flash Fluency Glows and Grows is a debriefing of a student's one-minute reading fluency check during guided reading. It provides immediate feedback to the student about their reading by addressing highlights in their reading as well as skills that still need practicing. This brief feedback session allows teachers to address the immediate needs of not just the student, but potentially that group of students. 

 
Instructional Openings
Front Loading

Front Loading gives my students an opportunity to preview skills or information in advance of it being taught to them. I used to only do Front Loading in the opening of my lessons, but now we have blended learning programs that allow my students to front-load information whenever they start reading. Some examples of Front Loading using online programs are iReady, which has additional lesson assignment capability, and MyOn, which allows my students to preview text about upcoming topics.

 
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